“The whole situation on the Western front was changed to our advantage”

The Rector of Remenham encouraged parishioners to give what they could.

Rector’s Letter

My Dear People,

With regard to the War, what cause for thankfulness was ours during the month of August: the whole situation on the Western front was changed to our advantage. Very humbly we have ground to hope that the Almighty has made bare his arm. In dark hours we knew that His care was over us; in the day of sunshine and success we acknowledge that “our sufficiency is of God”. We lift our hearts up unto the Lord.

I would call your attention to two appeals that are made to us in this issue of the Magazine. Please save all your fruit stones (plum, cherry, peach, nectarine, apricot, date) and hard nut shells; they are urgently needed for making charcoal for anti-gas masks to protect our fighting men. I shall be glad to receive at the Rectory between September 15 and 30 all stones and shells collected.

Then, secondly, urge the children to gather blackberries as soon as they are ripe; the Berkshire Education Committee are asking the head teachers to organise the effort throughout the county, and our headmistress is doing so for Remenham…

George H Williams

ANTI-GAS MASKS

Who will help our soldiers?

Mrs Barber, Culham Court, has received an urgent request from the Director-General of National Salvage asking us to collect fruit stones and nut-shells. They are needed for the production of charcoal for anti-gas masks, for the charcoal thus produced affords far greater protection to our soldiers against poison gas than any other known substance. The need will continue for the next two months. It is important that stones and nut shells should be forwarded in a dry condition; stones should be dried by being placed for a short time in the sun or in an oven. Will any one who is disposed to help, collect their fruit stones and nut shells, and send them, however small the quantity may be, to the Rectory any time between September 15 and 30?

BLACKBERRIES WANTED!

The Berkshire Education Committee has been asked by the Ministry of Food to arrange for the systematic picking and collecting of blackberries for jam making. Miss Mannion, the head mistress, is organising the collection by the school children of Remenham. A payment of 3d per lb will be made to the children for the amount collected, and they will be granted holidays for the picking expeditions. The picking should take place when the berries are ripe and dry. The children will work in organised parties under the supervision of their teachers, and they are warned to do no damage and to close all gates after them. All berries picked under this scheme must be reserved for Government use and none may be sold.

Remenham parish magazine, September 1918 (D/P99/28A/4)

Advertisements

Fruit and nuts in demand

The country wanted fruits and nuts to be collected.

COLLECTION OF FRUIT STONES AND NUTSHELLS

The National Salvage Council are most anxious to get as many of these as possible for the manufacture of a special charcoal for anti-gas masks.

Miss Edith Keevil, of Coley Park, Reading, has undertaken to receive and forward any amounts, large or small.

Last year’s stones (from jams, preserves, etc) are as good as this year’s. All hard fruit stones, including dates, and all hard nutshells, are good; but not green almonds, beech nuts, or fircones. Fruit stones should be kept separate from nutshells. They need not be washed, but should be well dried. Further particulars can be obtained at either Post Office.

COLLECTION OF BLACKBERRIES

So far as this is not being done by individual owners for their own use, this is being organized through the schools. Managers have power to grant occasional half holidays, and of course Saturdays can be used. Children, however, must not go wandering wherever they like without leave, and school parties are to work in organized gangs under their teachers, taking care to do no damage, and to close gates after them. All berries picked under this scheme must be reserved for Government use, and none may be sold. A payment of 3d per lb will be made to the children; and Head Teachers acting as local agents will be entitled to £3 per ton.

Braywick
10th September

Another attempt was made to-day to gather fruit, but a heavy storm came on, and school went on as usual.

Buscot
Sept. 10th

Older children taken out blackberrying in the afternoon; 44 pounds gathered, packed and sent to central agent.

Burghfield parish magazine, September 1918 (D/EX725/4); Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4, p. 204); Buscot CE School log book (C/EL73/2)

The life of a father or husband, or brother or son – perhaps yours – may depend on what you collect

Wokingham people were urged to save fruit stones.

Fruit Stones & Nut Shells are urgently needed. Converted into charcoal, they apparently possess special properties which are necessary in the manufacture of gas helmets. Ample stocks will be available in the future, but at the moment the need is most urgent. Will all therefore who read this set aside fruit stones and nut shells (don’t let them get mouldy) and the ‘Wolf Cubs’ will collect them. Don’t be afraid that you haven’t got enough to be any good – every little helps, and the life of a father or husband, or brother or son – perhaps yours – may depend on what you collect.

Wokingham St Sebastian parish magazine, August 1918 (D/P154C/28A/1)