“The return to the hell of war must be to our brave fellows a terrible wrench, far more than going out for the first time”

Winkfield men received a sympathetic hearing on their rare visits home on leave.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.

We regret to report that Pte. George Streamer has been very badly gassed and is now in Hospital in England. It is feared that he may be invalided out of the Army; his sight is badly affected.

Pte. Frank Brant has been seriously ill for several weeks. He is hospital in France and we trust that the anxiety of his relatives will still be relieved.

Pte. James Winnen has been suffering severely from shell-shock, but is now convalescent.

We are glad to welcome home on leave this month Lance-Corporal Edwin Gary, who recently won the Military Medal, Lance-Corporal Hartly Golding, and Privates G. Chaney, W. Harwood, W. Fisher and N. Town.

After the peace and quietness of a few days at home, the return to the hell of war must be to our brave fellows a terrible wrench, far more than going out for the first time. May they have a very real place in our gratitude and prayers.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/10)

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Temporary shades not effective

It proved impossible to get Winkfield church dark enough to comply with new laws aimed at preventing air raids.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS.

I want all to clearly understand why it is that we are unable for a few weeks to have Sunday Evening Service in the Parish Church. The new lighting regulations are the cause, but if shades on the lamps had been sufficient to meet the requirements of the authorities there would have been no need to discontinue the Evening Services. To make sure I asked the Sergeant of Police to attend Church on Sunday, January 9th, when it would be lighted up. He kindly came, and after the Service we tried some temporary shades which Mr. George Brown was good enough to bring, but as, in spite of these, the light was still reflected through the unstained windows, the Sergeant reported that only curtains over the windows on the north side and over the vestry and belfry windows could meet the case.

I therefore consulted the Churchwardens and we came to the conclusion that we were not justified in going to the considerable expense of putting up curtains when the Church at Winkfield Row could be darkened at a trifling cost; especially since it was only a question of about six weeks, and by the second Sunday in March we should be able to resume evening service in the Parish Church. Moreover I felt that it might be well to try the experiment of seven Sunday evening services at the other end of the parish, as if it were shown that these were valued, it might be possible another winter to have occasional services there, and judging from the good congregations that have assembled, it seems that the experiment was justified.

You will find in this magazine a leaflet addressed to the women of our neighbourhood by the District War Agricultural Committee. I hope it may meet with some real response, and I should be glad if I can be of any help in explaining the matter or on forwarding the names of any who would like to be put on the register.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

The following have recently joined His Majesty’s Forces:-

Alfred Brant, Queen’s Own Ox. Hussars.
John Carter, Royal Engineers.
Albert Higgs, King’s Royal Rifles.
Fred Lunn, 5th Rifle Brigade.

Pte. George Chaney has recently been in hospital at the Front, but we are glad to hear that he is now in a Convalescent camp and likely to be completely restored to health.

THE CHRISTMAS PRESENTS TO OUR MEN.- These accounts have been kindly audited by Mr. A. Elliot. They show:

Total Receipts … £24 5 11
Expenditure … 19 5 5½

Mrs. Maynard has handed the balance of £5 0s. 5½d. to Mrs. Ferard for Red Cross work in the parish.

Winkfield section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2

Three lives, full of promise, laid down for their country

The sad loss of three Warfield men prompted thoughts of how best to honour them.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

We have all felt that the present war has touched us as a parish more during the past month than before; three young lives, bright and full of promise, have been laid down for their King and Country. With pride for our nation, though with sorrow for our own personal loss, we shall remember the names of Philip Bowyer, John Chaney, and Albert Lovejoy. All trials of our faith are also calls from God. What more can we do? His is surely the thought that comes uppermost in our minds.

How many more will make a personal offer of themselves to their country in their memory? This is a question which I think all young men will seriously ask themselves if they have not done so already. Is God giving me a call? Am I faithfully answering it?

Again, are we making a great subject of prayer? Do we faithfully remember the noon-day bell, and the force of united prayer?

I daresay some of you may be thinking how can we commemorate the glorious deaths of our Warfield heroes. It occurred to me that we might erect a lofty Churchyard Cross, such as adorn many of our old country Churchyards, with the names and a suitable inscription upon its base. This would have to be entrusted to a competent Architect, and would stand as a lasting tribute to their heroism.

Ever yours affectionately in Christ,
WALTER THACKERAY.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

The war has taken fresh toll of us

People in Winkfield were asked to save money, and to help support local soldiers with sewing parties.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,-

We are inserting in this month’s Magazine a leaflet entitled “How to save and why,” and I hope that all will read it carefully and try to act upon it, for it points out how those of us who cannot go out to fight can yet help our country at this most critical time…

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

The war has taken fresh toll of us, and this parish has to mourn the loss of Lieut. Malcolm Blane of the 5th Cameron Highlanders, who fell in action in Flanders on September 25th. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Blane of Foliejon Park, and very deep sympathy is felt for them by their friends in Winkfield in this overwhelming sorrow.

2nd. Lieut. Ralph Hayes-Sadler, Corporal J.B. King, and Private Reginald Knight have now gone to the Front and will, we trust, have a place in our prayers.

Private Albert Carter has again been wounded but is doing well in a Convalescent camp at the base.

Private John Chaney was wounded in the leg and has been bought back to England; he has progressed so well that we hope soon to see him back in Winkfield, convalescent.

William Faithfull has joined the colours and his name is added to the list of Honour.

We are glad to hear that Private Charles Greathan has now practically recovered from his very serious wound; also that Lance-Corporal A. Kimble though not yet allowed out of hospital is expected home shortly.

It was nice to see Lance-Corporal R. Nickless once more in his place in the choir on Sunday, October 10th. His wound had sufficiently healed to allow of his coming home on short leave before he joined his regimental depot at Reading.

NOTICE.

With reference to the announcement which appeared in last month’s Magazine of Working Parties for the benefit of the Winkfield men at the front, it has been arranged to commence these at the Vicarage on Thursday, November 4th, at 2.30, when Mrs Maynard will be pleased to welcome any who have relations serving and who would like to make comforts to send out to them at Christmas.

It is hoped to have these meetings weekly and to hold them (after the first one) on Wednesday afternoons.

A small RUMMAGE SALE, the proceeds of which will go towards helping to provide funds for materials, &c., will be held in the Parish Room on Tuesday, November 9th, at 2 o’clock. Admission to the sale 1d.

WINKFIELD FUEL FUND.

Owing to the increased price of coal and to the uncertain state of the coal market, the Trustees have decided that Messrs. Minchin, whose tender has been accepted, shall make two deliveries only, viz, before November 4th and between Dec. 1st and 31st. The deliveries will be to depositors of 4/6- 5¼ cwt. and 4 cwt., and to depositors of 3/6 – 4 cwt. and 3¼ cwt.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

A village pays respect to two fallen lads

A village was united in grief.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.

There was a Memorial Service for the late John Chaney and Albert Lovejoy at 7.30 on October 13th. The Church was completely filled. The village welcomed the opportunity of paying respect to the two fallen lads. The service was similar to that held last month for the late Philip Bowyer. The parents of Philip Bowyer and John Cheney have written letters to express thanks for the services, and to communicate their thanks to the Clerk, the Choir, the Organist, and the Bell-ringers for their help.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

Grieved to hear of the death of an old scholar

One young soldier’s death was mourned by his old teachers.

11th October 1915
We are grieved to hear of the death on the field of battle of one of our old scholars, John Chaney. Our letter of sympathy to the mother and father was greatly appreciated by them.

Warfield CE School log book (C/EL26/3, p. 326)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
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Belgians mow and reap the hay

As Warfield men went to war, Belgian refugees helped to take on some of the work at home.

C.E.M.S.

Mr. Hammond, Junr., Secretary of the Wokingham Federation, was the recipient of a silver tray from the members of the branches in the Federation, on the occasion of his marriage on June 12th, and also of his resignation as Secretary, has now got a commission in the New Army. His place has been taken, at any rate for the present, by Mr. C. Jones, Moor Cottage, Binfield. Warfield was represented at the Slough Conference of the C.E.M.S. by the Vicar (Branch President), Mr. Brockbank (Branch Secretary), and Mr. H. Parks (Delegate of the Branch). We were very sorry that our other Delegate, Sir William Herschel, was unavoidably prevented from attending.

Some of our own Branch have been very helpful in a practical way, coming in the evening to mow and reap the hay in the Churchyard. Our biggest thanks are due to Messrs. G. Higgs, G. Lewis, H. Parks, Probyn, and B. Peat, also to the other non-members, L. Bristow, Chaney, Dyer, J. Lewis, our Belgian Guests Messrs. Taes and van der Voorde, also to Mrs. Thackeray and Mrs. Parks for their assistance.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

“The sad news has definitely come”

News was sometimes slow to reach families at home. One Winkfield man was killed in the wars first month, but only in the spring did the sad news reach his family. They also now had to worry about two of his brothers following his example.

VICAR’S LETTER
MY DEAR FRIENDS,-
Once again I must thank you very cordially and whole-heartedly for your kind and generous “Easter offering” and, as we have no Parish Social this year, let me now take the opportunity of thanking heartily the Wardens, Sidesmen, Sunday School, Teachers, Choir, Bell-ringers, and all other helpers in parish work.

I would refer you to the account of the Easter Vestry meeting for a summary of the Church accounts, and though our balance in hand for Church expenses has, owing to the expenditure of rather large sums on necessary repairs, been largely reduced, yet we still have a satisfactory balance on the right side.

Last year I was able to report an increased amount in the offertories given away, and so it is indeed cheering to know that this year we have eclipsed all records in this respect, and our special offertories for outside purposes have considerably more than doubled those of last year.

This is, of course, largely owing to special offertories for various War funds, and I trust that the lessons of self-denial and self-sacrifice which the war is teaching us will be fully learnt and continue to influence us when we once more enjoy the blessings of peace.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD

PARISH NOTES

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.
The following names have lately been added:
James Thurmer
Edward Thurmer
Albert Streamer
George Streamer
Lawrence Frederick Webb

Privates George Chaney, Cecil Jenden, Harry Ottaway, and Harry Rixon have just gone to the Front, and we will trust be remembered in our prayers.

We are glad to be able to state that Private John Williams is now much better and, we hope, is well on the road to complete recovery from his dangerous illness.

We much regret to announce that Private Charles Streamer was killed on August 26th. Some months ago it was reported that he had been wounded, but no information as to his whereabouts was forthcoming ; but now the sad news has definitely come of his death in the service of his Country.

Memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, April 25th, when there were present several members of his family to whom our sympathies go out. His two brothers, George and Albert, have just joined the Royal Berks Regiment.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

Every young man should know his duty

The Winkfield parish magazine was proud that many of its young men had joined up (and one female nurse), but urged others to follow them. They also shared a poem more notable for its keen patriotism than its literary merits.

Our Choir has been denuded of about half its senior members, five of them having volunteered for Foreign Services in answer to their country’s call.

We may perhaps feel rather proud of the number of men from this parish who are now serving their Country in this great National crisis, but it may well be that there are still some holding back who ought to come forward in response to the stirring appeal “Your King and Country need you.” As the Bishop of Chelmsford has truly said, “In this war or right against wrong every young man should seek to know his duty, and when he knows it face it even unto death.”

Besides a large number who have enrolled themselves as Special Constables, 45 young men of the parish are now either serving at the Front or undergoing training to take their part in this great war. We print a copy of the list posted on the Church door, and hope that more names will soon be added to this list of honour which perhaps at the end of the war may take more permanent form of a board or tablet so as to hand down to future generations the names of those who fought in the brave days of old.

NOW AT THE FRONT

Blunden, Horace Frank Ottaway, Ernest (Navy)
Brant, George Ottaway, Harry
Carter, Albert Reed, Charles
Harris, Herbert Rixon, Fred
Hayes-Sadler, Cecil Simmonds, John S. (Navy)
Lunn, Charles Streamer, Charles
Mitchell, George (Navy) Taylor, William (Navy)
Mitchell, Henry Thurmer, Ernest
Ottaway, Albert Woodage, Walter

Sister Constance Druce.

UNDERGOING TRAINING

Banstead, George Hoptroff, Henry
Berney, Thomas Reedham Jenden, Cecil
Chaney, George Kimble, Archibald
Chaney, John Maynard, Forster H.M.
Diaper, Arthur Nickless, Reginald
Fisher, William Nickless, Wallace
Gray, Edwin Parrott, William
Greatham, Charles Reed, Walter
Harris, Ernest Rixon, Henry
Hayes-Sadler, Ralph Spears, William
Hipple, George Thurmer, William
Holloway, William Thurmer, Robert
Holmes, Arthur Webb, Albert
Holmes, Fred

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A privilege to do one’s duty

The parishioners of Warfield felt the church was in danger, presumably from foreign invasion, and rallied round to help, as the church magazine bears witness:

NIGHT WATCH AT THE CHURCH.
“England expects that every man will do his duty” has been exemplified by the noble way in which the men of Warfield have come forth to guard their old Parish Church during this period of anxiety. One feels sure that they need no thanks, being always a privilege to do one’s duty. It is also right that the Parish Magazine should chronicle their names which are taken as they stand on the list before the Editor.

Messrs. J. Street, R. Searle, Fairminer, Goddard, Haines, E.Street, Pearce, Chaney, Peat, Higgs, Lovejoy, B. Bowyer, Brockbank, Johnson, G. Woodwards, C. Dyer, Bowyer, S. Moss, W. Dyer, E. Gale, H. Crocker, W. Bowyer, Crewe, Rickson, Parks, Dixon, R.Crow, J.Crow, G.Lewis, Joe Lewis, Dyer, Vicar, E.Gregory, B. Gregory, Inglefield, Lovejoy, S. White, Gill, Lewis, S. Bowyer, T. Bowyer and Son, Staniford, S. Stacey, Gale, Inskeep, A. Bowyer, Clee, Banham, Jakeman, Thatcher, Campbell, W. Excel, L. Bowyer, Carding, E. Bowyer, Ward and Woodwards.

Ascot, Bracknell, Cranbourne and Winkfield District church magazine, August 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/8)