Reading School’s contribution to the war

A complete listing of Reading School’s alumni who had served in the war.

OLD BOYS SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES.

This list has been compiled from information received up to December 14th, 1918; corrections and additions will be welcomed and should be addressed to: – R. Newport, Esq., Reading School, Reading.

Allnatt, Rifleman N.R. — London Rifle Brigade.
(killed in Action).
Ambrose, 2nd Lieut. L.C. — S.L.I.
Anderson, Pte. L.G. — Can. Exp. Force
Appelbee, 2nd Lieut. T. — 13TH West Yorks.
(Killed in Action).
Atkinson, Lieut. E.G. — Indian Army
Atkinson, Capt. G.P. — 6TH Royal North Lancs.
Atkinson, 2nd Lieut. J.C. — R.A.F.
Aust, 2nd Lieut. H.E. — Yorkshire Regt.
(Twice Wounded).
(Killed in Action).
Aveline, Lieut. A.P. — Royal Berks Regt,
(Wounded).
(Military Cross).
Baker, 2nd Lieut. A.C.S. — R.G.A.
Baker, Rifleman A.E. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Rifleman R.S. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Lieut. T.H. — 8TH Royal Berks Regt.
(Wounded)
Balding, Capt. C.D. — Indian Army.
Banks, Pte. W.R. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Bardsley, Capt. R.C — Manchester Regt.
(Wounded).
Barnard, F.P. —
Barroby, Trooper. F. — Strathcona Horse.
Barry, Capt. L.E. — R.A.F.
Baseden, Lieut. E. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Baseden, 2nd Lieut. M.W. — R.A.F.
Batchelor, Lieut. A.S. — Duke of Cornwall’s L.I.
Bateman, Capt. W.V. — Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Bayley, 2nd Lieut. F. — Chinese Labour Battalion.
Beckingsale, Pte. R.S. — Canadian Contingent.
Beckingsale, Capt. R.T. — Tank Corps (Military Cross).
(Wounded).

Belsten, E.K. — R.A.F.
Biddulph, 2nd Lieut. R.H.H. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Died of Wounds).
Bidmead, Pte. — Wilts regt.
Black, Pte. F. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Blazey, A.E.H. — R.A.F.
Blazey, 2nd Lieut. J.W. — Royal Berks Regt
(killed in Action).
Bleck, Lieut. W.E. — R.F.A.
Bliss, 2nd Lieut. A.J. — Leinster Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Bliss, Pte. W. — 2ND Batt.Hon.Art.Coy. (more…)

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The war has taken fresh toll of us

People in Winkfield were asked to save money, and to help support local soldiers with sewing parties.

THE VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,-

We are inserting in this month’s Magazine a leaflet entitled “How to save and why,” and I hope that all will read it carefully and try to act upon it, for it points out how those of us who cannot go out to fight can yet help our country at this most critical time…

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

The war has taken fresh toll of us, and this parish has to mourn the loss of Lieut. Malcolm Blane of the 5th Cameron Highlanders, who fell in action in Flanders on September 25th. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Blane of Foliejon Park, and very deep sympathy is felt for them by their friends in Winkfield in this overwhelming sorrow.

2nd. Lieut. Ralph Hayes-Sadler, Corporal J.B. King, and Private Reginald Knight have now gone to the Front and will, we trust, have a place in our prayers.

Private Albert Carter has again been wounded but is doing well in a Convalescent camp at the base.

Private John Chaney was wounded in the leg and has been bought back to England; he has progressed so well that we hope soon to see him back in Winkfield, convalescent.

William Faithfull has joined the colours and his name is added to the list of Honour.

We are glad to hear that Private Charles Greathan has now practically recovered from his very serious wound; also that Lance-Corporal A. Kimble though not yet allowed out of hospital is expected home shortly.

It was nice to see Lance-Corporal R. Nickless once more in his place in the choir on Sunday, October 10th. His wound had sufficiently healed to allow of his coming home on short leave before he joined his regimental depot at Reading.

NOTICE.

With reference to the announcement which appeared in last month’s Magazine of Working Parties for the benefit of the Winkfield men at the front, it has been arranged to commence these at the Vicarage on Thursday, November 4th, at 2.30, when Mrs Maynard will be pleased to welcome any who have relations serving and who would like to make comforts to send out to them at Christmas.

It is hoped to have these meetings weekly and to hold them (after the first one) on Wednesday afternoons.

A small RUMMAGE SALE, the proceeds of which will go towards helping to provide funds for materials, &c., will be held in the Parish Room on Tuesday, November 9th, at 2 o’clock. Admission to the sale 1d.

WINKFIELD FUEL FUND.

Owing to the increased price of coal and to the uncertain state of the coal market, the Trustees have decided that Messrs. Minchin, whose tender has been accepted, shall make two deliveries only, viz, before November 4th and between Dec. 1st and 31st. The deliveries will be to depositors of 4/6- 5¼ cwt. and 4 cwt., and to depositors of 3/6 – 4 cwt. and 3¼ cwt.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/11)

Awful casualties feared

Malcolm Blane (1892-1915) was the younger son of the family which owned Foliejon Park. He was a lieutenant with the Cameron Highlanders, his family coming originally from Scotland. The Vansittart Neales would have socialised with the Blanes, and his death at Loos struck home.

2 October 1915
2nd trenches reached. Holding them. Fear awful casualties. Malcolm Blane killed….

We all packed in motor [and] took Phyllis & Magdalen to Reading – they to Southampton. We to try & find Bubs. She on duty. Great procession (recruiting going on)

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale (D/EX73/3/17/8)

Why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves?

The people of Winkfield were urged to support the young men who were heading to the Front.

VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

When you receive this Magazine we shall be nearing the completion of a year of War, and this fact cannot fail to solemnize in our minds and make us seriously consider whether we are one and all doing our duty in this supreme crisis of our Nation’s history.

The call to service and sacrifice has been answered by numbers of our young men – a list of whom is printed in this month’s Magazine – but have we who are unable to offer ourselves for active service contributed all we can and ought to the common cause? As the Bishop of London says, why should the young do all the fighting and the dying and offer the great sacrifice by themselves? The sacrifice that is for all should be offered by all, and all are bound to make the resolution “I will pray, I will repent, I will serve, I will save.”

And yet we must sorrowfully confess that the army of intercessors to offer prayer as sacrificial as the self-oblation of the millions of men who have offered themselves for war, has not been forthcoming; unlike France or Russia, out Churches have not been filled with men and women to pray for the men whose peril and blood is their shield, and I must confess to much heart sickness and disappointment that even our intercessory services in the second Sunday evenings and the last Sunday mornings in the month have not been better attended.

What is the explanation? It cannot be that we are indifferent to our country’s need or without love to our brothers at the Front; nor is it that England does not believe in God; there is enough love of our country and enough belief in God to crowd our Churches with earnest suppliants. What then is lacking? Is it not the belief in prayer and especially the belief in united supplication in God’s house? Is not the lack of this the reason why the men and women who ought to be in the praying line have not proved so steadfast as the men in the fighting line, who so greatly need our prayers, and surely have a right to expect them.

I sincerely hope therefore that large numbers will make a real and special effort to attend the special Intercession Services on Wednesday, August 4th and on Sunday, August 8th, of which notice is given in another column. The result of this war will depend very largely on the atmosphere of prayer which has been created, for prayer is the strongest force in the world, and as has been truly said, through prayer we bring our nation and our Allies into contact with Christ, and set the life of the whole Society as well as individuals in the stream of that purpose of redemptive love which can overrule even war for God.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,
H. M. MAYNARD.

PARISH NOTES

Lieut. Godfrey Loyd and Private Henry Hoptroff have just gone to the Front, and Privates Edwin Gray, Ernest Gray, Edward Holloway and Lance-Corporal Reginald Nickless are under orders to be in readiness to go immediately. We trust that they and their naturally anxious relatives will have a place in our prayers.

Much sympathy is felt for the family of Private John Williams (Royal Field Artillery) who died in hospital after a very long and distressing illness. He was buried with full military honours at Cosham Cemetery on July 1st, and special memorial prayers were said for him on Sunday, July 4th.

NOTICE

On Wednesday, 4th August, the anniversary of the declaration of war, a great service in St. Paul’s Cathedral has been arranged, when the King and all the leaders of the nation will attend to inaugurate the second year of the war be asking God’s help. In Winkfield Church, there will be Celebration of the Holy Communion at 8 a.m., and Litany and Intercession at 11 a.m. Also Evensong and Intercession at S. Mary the Less at 7.30 p.m.

On Sunday, August 8th, both morning and evening, there will be special services with Intercessions and Thanksgivings for the way in which the country has been preserved from many dangers.

The following is list of Winkfield men serving in His Majesty’s Forces at Home and Abroad.
(more…)

More cursing and swearing about the Germans than ever before

The sinking of the Lusitania continued to outrage people.

Florence Vansittart Neale
Lusitania sunk off Irish coast. 2 submarines. 1300 drowned.

William Hallam
In the work shops to-day more cursing and swearing about the Germans than ever I’ve heard. This afternoon wife & I went up to Draycott Camp. Quite a town of huts there. 11,700 Scotch regiment there. Had a talk to one, a Cameron man, who told me there were 350 university men in the ranks of their Battalion. Although it was a very hot afternoon, it was quite cold this evening coming back.

Diaries of Florence Vansittart Neale (D/EX73/3/17/8) and William Hallam (D/EX1415/23)