These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
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A great blessing to the hospitals

The work of women and children in Cookham Dean was gratefully received.

Cookham Dean War Working Party.

The Vicar has been asked to make the following known, through the Magazine:

From June 6th to Ocober 25th the undermentioned work has been sent out:

(A) To the Surgical Emergency Dressing Society at Maidenhead, 571 ‘T’ bandages, 14 flannel bed jackets, four nightingales, eight flannel shirts, 10 pairs of socks, 13 mufflers, 14 pairs of mittens, four helmets, 244 capelines;

(B) To Lady Smith-Dorrien, 68 hospital bags. The total number of articles being 950.

Mrs. Hunt and Miss Hawkes desire to thank all workers who have so kindly contributed to the result; those who have attended the working party; those who have done work in their own home; and last, but not least, the children in the mixed school who have given up their playtime, and who have helped on the work so willingly…

The following letter has been received from Miss R. Bulkeley:

Redcroft, Maidenhead, October 11th, 1917.

Dear Mrs Hunt, Miss Hawkes has sent me from your War Working Party such splendid hospital and other comforts, and I do not know how to thank you all enough. They are so beautifully made, and will be a great blessing to the Hospitals and Units to which they are sent.

In answer to their appeal yout ‘T’ bandages and capelines go regularly on the 6th of every month to No.2 New Zealand General Hospital, and they say they are just what they like.

Many, many thanks again for all your generous help.

Yours sincerely, Ruby Bulkeley.

Cookham Dean parish magazine nov 1917 (D/P43B/28A/11)

A call for economical but wholesome recipes

The vicar of Wargrave was at the heart of the village’s flourishing War Savings Association, and also efforts to encourage food to be produced locally. The March issue of the parish magazine announced:

War Savings and War Rations

A meeting of the Wargrave War Savings Association will be held on Saturday, March 10th at 7 .p.m., in the Iron Church Building. All Parishioners are most cordially invited to attend. The subject of War Rations will also be discussed.

The total sum paid into the Secretary’s hands up to February 26th, amounts to £1014 9s. 6d., which has been extended in the purchase of 726 Certificates value £1 five years hence; 21 value £12 five years hence: and 13 value £25 five years hence.

Bonus

There is no doubt that the Chairman’s kind gift of one sixpenny coupon on every Certificate up to ten has proved a strong inducement to save that number. And he is so pleased with the response that he has most generously determined to extend his offer up to 25 Certificates for each person.

Vicarage Office Hours

On Saturdays 9.30-10.30 .a.m. and 5.30-6.30 .p.m. the Parish Room is open for War Savings Business.

Certificates due members may then be obtained, and Certificates may be purchased.

During the days of the War Loan the Vicar was glad to welcome War Savings business on any day and at any time when he was at home, but he must now ask members to be more particular in the observance of Office Hours.

Money may be sent to the Vicar if accompanied with a clear statement of Certificates required, full names and sufficient postal address.

The meeting duly took place:

War Savings Association

A very well attended Meeting was held on Saturday, March 10th, in the Iron Church Building. Mr. Bond presided and gave an address on Food Production and War Rations.

A Committee was appointed for Food Production of which Mrs. Bulkeley is Chairman, supported by Mrs. Hinton, Miss. Rhodes, and Messrs. Butcher, Chenery, Crisp and Pope.

A good deal of work has already been done in organising parties to dig, and in providing allotments and seed potatoes for those who want them.

A Committee was also appointed for Food Economy in charge of Mrs. Winter, supported by Mrs. Bennett, Mrs. Cain, Mrs. Chenery, and Mrs. Hermon.

It is hoped that the committee may give much help in disseminating information and enlisting support. Mrs. Winter will be very grateful for any economical recipes which have proved wholesome and successful. These recipes will be exhibited in the Parish Room.

Wargrave parish magazine, March and April 1917 (D/P145/28A/31)

Dressings most acceptable for a Casualty Clearing Station in the Dardanelles

The Wargrave women toiling over making bandages and other medical supplies for wounded soldiers were gratified to find their products were appreciated at the Front.

Surgical Dressings

The Wargrave Emergency Society have pursued their labours with admirable perseverance and industry. We are very glad to be able to print the splendid record of the work done up to the present together with one of the many tokens of appreciation from the Front.

There is now a Parent Society in Wargrave with several daughter Branches. Knowl Hill did much to help and a flourishing Branch was established there. But unfortunately there came an outbreak of scarlet fever and they were obliged to stop working for a time. It was disappointing to the Workers and a great loss to the Society but we hope that the trouble will soon by overpast.

From Somewhere behind the Lines in the Dardanelles
Lt. Col. —– Casualty Clearing Station,
Dardanelles, Sept. 20th,
To Miss Ruby Bulkeley,
Surgical Dressings Emergency Society
(Maidenhead Branch)

I have received your parcel of Sterilized Dressings and Bandages quite safely today. Please accept my best thanks. I also received some sent from the Wargrave Branch, but I do not know where to write to thank for them and they were not acknowledged. Will you kindly convey my thanks, as I am not sure where Wargrave is.

These Dressings are most acceptable, especially for us as my clearing station happens to be so situated that the vast majority of wounded in the A—— Area come, through our hands, and when I tell you that after one action we had some 800 cases in less than 24 hours, many requiring operations, and practically all requiring to be redressed as only “First Aid” could be rendered previously, you will see that our requirements are really enormous and everything that kind friends at home can send us some in useful and are most welcome –

The other C.C.’s in this Area are the —–
The —– Australian – the —- and the —-.
(Making 5 C.C. Stations altogether)

The class of Dressings you sent us are in my opinion admirably suited to the work of the Casualty Cleaning Stations, but would not be useful to the Field Ambulance.

If your Society has more to spare, I shall always be glad to have some, and I feel sure you must help to relive the Government supply by helping us direct.
Believe me, yours truly,
——–
Lt. Col. R.A.M.C.

Warm socks, shirts, pyjamas, and all gifts of warm things are gratefully received, to forward with the dressings. These wounded come straight from the Trenches and Battlefield, and warm clothing, clean and fresh is comforting.
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Making surgical dressings

A small band of Wargrave women spent almost the full working week making bandages for wounded soldiers. Their pioneering example was followed by a number of other villages.

Surgical Dressing Emergency Society

The excellent work inaugurated and organised by Miss Choate, has greatly increased and is still developing. The ladies of the neighbourhood meet regularly five days a week at Millwards, where they manufacture surgical dressings from all sorts of materials that can be washed and sterilised.

A Branch has now been opened at Maidenhead under the direction of Misses Bulkeley, which is also supplied with sterilising apparatus. There is another Branch at Waltham St. Lawrence and another at Longparish in Hampshire. Surgical pillows etc. are made up at Crazies Hill and a great deal of work is done by the ladies at Knowl Hill.

Thanks are due to Mr. Burgess who has lent furniture to the tea room, to Mr Easterling for the tables, to the International Stores for empty cases, and to the Stationmaster of Wargrave (Mr Malpress) and all his staff who are helping the Society in every possible way in forwarding, collecting, and delivering parcels.

The Society are sending Dressings to France, Servia [sic], and the Dardanelles, and very grateful letters of thanks are daily received from those who sadly want them.

Wargrave parish magazine, September 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

Making dressings for wounded soldiers

20 women in Wargrave set up a working party to manufacture dressings to treat wounded soldiers.

On April 27th, in connection with the Wargrave Emergency Surgical Dressings Society, a Branch was opened at the Working Men’s Club by Miss Sinclair; in the unavoidable absence of Miss Choate.

Mrs. Bulkeley has kindly consented to be President. The Working Committee consists of Mrs. W. Dulley, Mrs. Hawkins, Miss Lovett, Miss Oliver, Mrs. T. Whitbread, and Mrs. Wrigley.

At present there are about 20 members. Three boxes of dressings and linen for the wounded have been sent to Headquarters, at Wargrave, to be sterilised and sent to the Front.

Thanks are due to the Club Committee for the use of the room, to Mr. and Mrs. Wrigley for a Social, which realized £1 7s. in aid of the fund for materials; to Mrs. Bulkeley for materials for Respirators and a subscription, and to Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Barham, Mrs. Brunsden, Mrs. Dell, Mrs. Hawkins, Mrs. Marshall and Miss Maskell for linen; to Miss Sinclair for a subscription.

New Members will be gladly welcomed. The Meetings are on Thursdays, between 3 and 6.30 p.m.

Old Linen, Collars, etc. will be greatly appreciated.

M. Firbank, Hon. Secretary.
May 22nd, 1915.

Wargrave parish magazine, June 1915 (D/P145/28A/31)

Stamps from the seat of war

Ralph Glyn’s mission to Serbia had been a success, and on his way home he received this letter from the War Office:

War Office
February 17 [1915]

Dear Glyn

There is just a chance of this catching you at Salonika on your return journey. Your long letter about Italy and your letter about Greece both duly received, and most interesting. You seem to have done great work in Serbia. Of course I smiled all over my face when I read all about you & your conclave with the General Staff. You will no doubt have a great deal to tell us when you get back, which cannot well be put in writing. In fact in these days one hardly likes to write anything down. Things have been humming here – Col. Thomson is going to Bucharest as MA & Tom Cunninghame is going to Athens. I wish the latter wasn’t so deaf, but he knows a good deal & is I hope likely to be of great assistance some day by being at Athens.

Give my love to Mrs Mark if you happen to come across her in Athens. How nice of you to think about the stamps for my small boy. Bring a few along with you when you come home and I will end them to him then. He will be quite popular with his schoolfellows if he can produce “Stamps from the Seat of War”.

I have sent a copy of your “Opinion on Greece” to Eustace Percy at the FO as requested – given a copy to him & one to MO5. I will also show the paper to Tom Cunninghame & CB Thomson. I am glad I was saved your unpleasant journey. I certainly should not have been well enough to write letters!

No time for more at present.

Yours ever
B E Bulkeley

Letter from B Bulkeley to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C31/2)