“A terrible blow to his parents”

Tribute is paid to Burghfield men whose deaths had been reported.

THE WAR

Casualties
C Searle (killed)
Sidney Cooper (wounded and missing, reported killed)
Ernest F Bunce (died of wounds)

Discharge
R Jordan (wounded)

Obituary Notices

Lance-Corporal Ernest Bunce is reported as having died from wounds received on the 18th November; he was on 1/1st Berks Yeomanry in Palestine during General Allenby’s victorious advance. No news except the telegram of his death has reached his parents, deepest sympathy is felt for them and his twin sister Elsie in their great sorrow. They wish to return grateful thanks for many kind messages.

Christopher Searle of the Royal West Surrey was killed on October 4th in France. His Commanding Officer writes of him that he had just gone through an attack with his Battalion safely, and on going to fetch some water, a shell burst close to him, and he was killed instantly.

“The Company all regret him, he did his work well and was very popular.”

It is a terrible blow to his parents, he was their only son, but he was a brave lad, and they must feel very proud of him.

Sidney Cooper, 2nd Royal Berks, of Pinge Wood, was reported as “wounded and missing” some time ago, he is now believed to have been killed.

Fred W Fisher died in hospital at Brighton on December 6th after a long sad illness partly due to a kick from a mule. He enlisted in the ASC in March 1916, and was fit for duty for only a few months.

Burghfield parish magazine, January 1918 (D/EX725/4)

“Thank God that England realised her duty and answered the call to defend the weak”

The vicar of Warfield was keen to take part in the National Mission, after seeing wounded men being nursed in Brighton Pavilion.

THE VICAR’S LETTER

MY DEAR FRIENDS AND PARISHIONERS,

I hope to hold meetings in the parish for the coming National Mission. I have been away for a short holiday at Brighton and feel that we must now begin in earnest to take our part as a parish in this great National movement. I hope to address you frequently in Church on this subject and keep you in touch with all that is going on; I also hope to speak to our various organisations at their monthly meetings. The nation will only be called to repentance and hope by the co-operation of each individual. Each one has to learn to say “This Mission is for me.”

God is speaking to us in a way which He has not spoken to us as a nation before. This was forcibly impressed upon my mind during the past fortnight, when I daily saw some of the men at the Pavilion Hospital at Brighton, deprived of either leg or arm. Brave fellows! They had borne the brunt, but we were all sinners. They suffered, but you and I suffer with them. What fruit was this pruning to produce? “When He slew them, they sought Him: and turned them early and enquired after God.”

We have to pray for righteousness and be righteous. We have to bring the nation back to God. There is a high ideal before us, let us reach it. Thank God that England realised her duty and answered the call to defend the weak; had she not, in the providence of God she might have had a heavier cross to bear at some later date. God in His Love is reminding us all that He is still the Judge of all the world, and by the sorrows of this war is calling us back to Himself.

Ever yours affectionately in Christ,

WALTER THACKERAY.

Warfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, June 1916 (D/P151/28A/6)

The air is full of rumours

Lady Mary Glyn informed her son Ralph of the latest news at home.

March 8th [1916]

I did calls yesterday. Volck is the name of the new manager at Sage’s. Wife very Brightonian. Decollee at 5 pm and they have taken the Canes’ house in Precincts. They tell me of an RNS Lieutenant called Meynell with his wife at the Peterborough Hotel and a flying man called Gordon England has taken the Archdeacon’s house where the Cooks were. I winder if you know him. I understand there is a great concentration of flying men and inventors & machines to tempt the Zepps here now, and a wireless station at Dogsthorpe & guard of 40 men. Peterborough is becoming quite as central as it can ever hope to be….

The air is full of rumours of sea action, of liveliness in the North Sea. And Churchill has just made one more limelight dramatic speech demanding Fisher’s recall. Hedworth has made his debut as a speaker and hopes Churchill will go back to duty in the trenches.

Lady Exeter says Lord Exeter has been in hospital nearly all his time at Alexandria – influenza, and very seedy in hospital there….

Own Mur

Letter from Lady Mary to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C2/3)

“The war is doing us a lot of good”

Maysie Wynne-Finch wrote to her brother Ralph Glyn in Egypt with the news that she and her wounded husband were going to be based in Windsor until he was well enough to return to the Front. Their aunt Sybil was still receiving letters from her son Ivar, written before his recent death in action.

Feb 11/16
11 Bruton St W
Darlingest R.

I had a mysterious message from Meg’s house today saying Colonel Sykes had called leaving a small parcel from you, & saying he was just home from the Dardenelles [sic]. I had the said parcel brought here, & it is a couple of torch refills apparently unused from Stephenson. I must get hold of Colonel Sykes for an explanation.

Our plans are now fixed up to a point. The doctor, [dear?] man, said John was not to return to France for 3 months, this being so the regimental powers that be used much pressure to get him to reconsider his refusal of the 5th Battalion Adjutancy, & so after being told they won’t try & keep him after he’s fit for France, he has said yes. There is no doubt it’s good useful work for home service, if it has to be, & I am glad for him, though I suppose I shall now see little or nothing of him at all. He begins on Monday. He went house hunting on Tuesday – a depressing job, as there are hardly any houses to be had, & those one more beastly than the other! However – nothing matters – it’s just wonderful to be there at all. We shall take what we can & when we can – that’s all. The house we long for, but it’s not yet even furnished, is one, & a charming old house done up & owned by that old bore Arthur Leveson Gower, you remember the man, we met at the Hague, years ago. Tony has been ill again with Flu, the 2nd time this year…

We’ve just had tea with Aunt Syb. She got another letter from Ivar written Jan 1, last Friday. It’s awful for her, & yet I think there is most joy, rather than pain, the hopeless silence is for a moment filled, though but as it were by an echo. Joan looks pale & oh so sad. She’s wonderfully brave & unselfish to Aunt Syb. Poor little Joanie…

I hear Pelly’s opinion is that Kut must fall. London was filled with rumours of a naval engagement on Monday & Tues, but as far as I can make out without foundation.

I met Ad[miral] Mark Ker[r] in the street the other day, & we had a long talk. I fear he’s not improved – & I think very bitter at being out of it all. He was interesting over Greece etc, but there is so much “I” in all he says, one cannot help distrusting a great deal. He’s very upset as he was starting to return to Greece a week ago & at the very last moment was stopped, & now he’s simply kicking his heels, not knowing what’s going to happen next. “Tino” now is of course his idol & here – I feel a pig saying all this, as I do feel sorry for him, & he was most kind. Yesterday he asked us to lunch to meet Gwladys [sic] Cooper, Mrs Buckmaster, how lovely she is, & seems nice, almost dull John thought! We then went on to the matinee of her new play. Most amusing, she is delightful, & Hawtrey just himself…

As you can imagine air-defence & the want of it is now all the talk. One of our airships has taken to sailing over this house from west to east every morning at 8.30 am. I hear we broke up 6 aeroplanes & killed 3 men the night of the last raid. All leave is now stopped from France. We’ve just lunched with Laggs Gibbs, who came over a day before the order came out. He says it’s said to be because of some new training scheme we have & not because of any offensive either way.

John had a Med Board today, & narrowly escaped being given another 3 months sick leave apparently. They implored him to go to Brighton & said he was very below parr [sic] etc, however he bounced them into giving him home duty, & they’ve made it 3 months, & “no marching”, etc, tc, etc. Of course as Adjutant he wouldn’t have that anyhow.

We think we have got a house, but can’t get in for a fortnight.

Bless you darling
Your ever loving Maysie (more…)

An emergency nurse

At the very beginning of the war, Nurse Andrews, an employee of Sonning and Woodley District Nursing Association, had been called to join the Territorial Force Nursing Service. The Association tried to get her released, but being informed this was not likely, they had decided to make arrangements to replace her.

Friday October 2nd, 1914
Nurse Bell, an Emergency Nurse, had arrived on September 8th to be in readiness to take charge of the District in the event of Nurse Andrews being summoned to nurse in the Territorial Force Nursing Services….

On Friday September 23rd Nurse Andrews was summoned to the 2nd Eastern Hospital at Brighton. As it was thought that her services would be required there for a long time, the Committee were advised to obtain if possible the services of a temporary Queen’s Nurse. The Secretary had made applications to the Queen Victoria Nursing Institute [in Reading] for [one] and on the morning of October 2nd had received a letter recommending Nurse Gertrude Mitchell who was ready to come at once. The Committee decided to engage her services to commence on Tuesday October 6th and to give her salary at the same rate as Nurse Andrews.

Sonning and Woodley District Nursing Association minutes (D/QNA/SO1/1)