More than enough money for a good new flag

Braywick
24th January 1919

The concert proved a great success and more than enough money was raised for a good new flag and supplementing the staff. Money over goes to war charities. The scholars acquitted themselves very credibly at their concert and received many notes. The Sum of £8 was the result of their efforts.

East Hagbourne
1919
Jany 24th

Having been demobilised I returned to take charge of this school today.
E J Packer

Log books of Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); East Hagbourne School (C/EL35/2)

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A new flag for Peace Day

Braywick
17th January 1919

As the school flag is worn out, we the teachers and scholars, determined to purchase a new one for ‘Peace Day’. So with the managers’ consent a half holiday was granted to-day that we might give a concert, the proceeds of which to buy a flag. Children worked very heartily with their teachers to become proficient in their plays, dances and songs and good results are hoped for.

Speenhamland
Jan 17

Visit of Francis C E Lewis of the RFA, an old boy.


Log books of Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4)
; St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3)

Some garments are still needed for our men at the front

9th – 13th December

Mistress could not undertake the usual quarterly examinations, as there has been so much sickness about and the attendances irregular owing to holidays for blackberrying in autumn, then illness with a month closure and lately heavy rains that it seemed more to the children’s advantage to teach those present, than to examine intelligent scholars. This week rain made sad havoc with the attendances, also many of the girls were taking part in various war concerts which necessitated their absence on afternoon, so that it seems almost impossible to make much progress…
The elder girls are busily engaged in their spare time producing some comforts for our men at the front. Some garments are still needed there.

Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4, p. 212)

‘Peace’ after four weary years

Braywick
12th November 1918

At 4pm the Mayor sent round requesting that all schools in the borough be closed for the rest of the week. Celebrations were held in the town and village, and the children were able to attend. ‘Peace’ after four weary years. ‘God save the King’.

Boyne Hill
Nov: 12th

It has been decided to close the schools at 3.45 pm this afternoon for the remainder of the week. The percentage of attendance is 73.3. War Loan £8.10.6.

Log books of Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

Cheers for the allies and the old boys fighting

Schools celebrated the end of the war.

Riseley Common
Nov. 11th

Acting on the assumption that peace has been declared (or rather an armistice arranged), as we could hear sirens sounding and church bells ringing, we have sung the National Anthem, “Praise God” etc.

St Stephen’s Boys’ School, Windsor
November 11th 1918

Armistice day.

Stoke Road School, Slough
November 11th 1918

School was re-opened this morning – 63% (194/308). The M.O.H ordered the school to be closed until November 18th.

During the morning I received the news that Germany had accepted the Allies’ terms and signed the Armistice.

The children formed a hollow square in front of the flag-staff, to which a new rope had been attached in readiness. The flag was hoisted by the youngest boy in the school to the singing of the National Anthem. The flag was then saluted and cheers were given for the allies and the old boys fighting. Edw. J Baldwin “shinned” up the pole to attach the rope. John Cross hoisted the Flag.

Sunninghill: St Michael’s CE Mixed School
11th November 1918

Beginning of Armistice. On the occasion of this I addressed the children, & hoisted the Union Jack. The National Anthem was then sung.

Stanford Dingley National School
November 11th 1918

Today, news was received that the Armistice was signed at 11 o’clock AM between Germany and the allies, this concluding the Great European War. After signing several National Songs concluding with the National Anthem. The children dispersed at 3 o’clock this afternoon.

King Street School, Maidenhead
11th November 1918

There were 107 children present this morning. The news of the signing of the armistice made a difference to the attendance this afternoon. 73 children present.

Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School log book
11th November 1918

News of Germany’s signing of the armistice reached the school at 11.10 am. At midday the whole school assembled and cheered the news after singing “God Save the King”. A half holiday was given by the mayor in honour of the great event.

Abingdon Girls CE School
1918, 11th-15th November

Children were dismissed at 3 o’clock on Armistice Day at the Vicar’s request.

Coleshill CE School
15th November 1918

On Monday (11th) when news of ‘The Armistice’ arrived the children sang ‘The King’ and saluted the ‘flag’ with cheers for our Army and Navy; they were then sent home.

Sonning CE Girls and Infants
11th November 1918

School closed in the afternoon to celebrate the signing of the Armistice.

Littlewick CE School
November 11th 1918

At 11.30 AM we heard bells and hooters going and knew that the Armistice was signed and that the war was over. The children cheered and sang “God Save the King” and Rule Britannia, and put up the Union Jack.

Buscot CE School
Nov. 11th

News that the armistice had been signed reached Buscot in the afternoon. The Flag was hoisted, cheers given, National Anthem sung and the hymn “Now thank we all our God”. The children were dismissed at 3 pm, and a holiday given next day Nov 12th.

Aston Tirrold
11th November 1918

We re-opened this morning after a closure of nearly a fortnight on account of influenza. Only 42 children are present out on 75 on roll. Just before noon the rector brought in the news that the Armistice had been signed. Secular work was suspended, and we humble fell upon our knees and heartedly thanked God for His great mercy vouchsafed unto us. A holiday to commemorate the Victory was given in the afternoon.

Braywick
11th November 1918

School opened again this morning [following closure for influenza] with a very fair amount of scholars and after consulting the doctor it was decided to mark register and proceed with usual work which was done accordingly. Peace however was declared in the morning and great excitement presided, many scholars remaining at home in the afternoon. School was resumed on Tuesday, the national anthem was sung, patriotic songs, flag waving etc and children kept quite excited.

Great Coxwell
11th November 1918

War Ended. Holiday in the afternoon to celebrate the great event.

Milton
Nov 11th

Re-opened again this morning [after closure for influenza] with 28 children, several still being ill. Heard in the dinner hour of the Armistice being signed, & gave the children the half holiday.

Log books of Riseley Common CE School, Swallowfield (C/EL99/3); St Stephen’s Boys’ School, Windsor (88/SCH/23/7, p. 167); Stoke Road School, Slough (89/SCH/28/1); Sunninghill: St Michael’s CE Mixed School (88/SCH/32/3); Stanford Dingley National School (C/EL21); King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1); Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School (C/EL72/3); Abingdon Girls CE School (C/EL 2/2); Coleshill CE School (D/P40/28/5); Sonning CE Girls and Infants (89/SCH/1/4);Littlewick C.E. School(85/SCH/5/2, p. 197); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2); Aston Tirrold CE School log book (C/EL105/1, p. 169); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 208); Milton CE School (D/P85/25/25); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2)Great Coxwell CE School (C/EL81/2, p. 83); Newbury St Nicolas CE (Boys) School (90/SCH/5/3); Purley CE School (C/EL85/2)

Numbers so low, and sickness so rife

Influenza was taking its toll, and many schools would miss out on celebrating the armistice as a result.

Sonning
4th November 1918

On Monday 4th November only 22 boys presented themselves at school. I informed the Correspondent (Rev G.S Crawford) and he communicated with the B.E.C. The Secretary of the B.E.C acting on the advice of the school Medical Officer advised the closing of the school until Nov 18th.

Braywick
4th November 1918

School re-assembled as usual this morning but as the numbers were so low, and sickness so rife Dr Patterson ordered the school to close for a week longer.

Upton
4. XI.18

Henry Roberts and Francis Webb had their marks cancelled during the morning as they appeared to be suffering from influenza.

Milton
Nov 4th

I, Alice Andrews, take up my duties here as Head Mistress.
Owing to Influenza only 30 children assembled – sent for the Rector who advised me to wire to Reading – dismissed children to await instructions.

Boyne Hill
Nov: 4th

School reopened at 9 am with 172 present out of 201. The MOH has been notified.
The building has been thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.
Children have again been dismissed until Nov: 11th.

Log books of Sonning Boys school (89/SCH/1/2); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); Upton CE School (C/EL48/2); Milton CE School (D/P85/25/25); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3);

The epidemic is very serious

Some schools were working normally, others felled by flu.

Braywick
22nd October 1918

To-day, Tuesday the number were considerably lower. Nurse came over to see mistress and report to Dr Patterson. Shortly after, a messenger came from the Dr requesting mistress to close the school at once until Nov 4, in common with nearly all the borough schools. The epidemic is very serious in this parish, several deaths have occurred from that complaint. Mistress sent notes to the parents explaining the reason for the closure.

Speenhamland
Oct 22

I gave a lecture to upper Standards on the work of the Navy at the request of the Navy League.

Hampstead Norreys
22nd Oct.

Have closed this afternoon for blackberrying.


Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4); St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2)

The epidemic has increased

Influenza was worsening.

Reading
21st October 1918

The epidemic [influenza] has increased. Number present this morning 99.

Miss Poffley is absent suffering from Influenza, also Edith Sawyer, the Nurse Girl.

Aston Tirrold
21st October 1918

The Navy League ‘notes’ on Trafalgar Day received from the Education Office.

Braywick
21st October 1918

The attendance to-day, Monday, has been very low, owing to the prevalence of influenza colds. Mistress wrote to the medical officer and placed matters before him.

Log books of Reading ChristChurch CE Infants School (89/SCH/7/6, p. 194); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); Aston Tirrold CE School (C/EL105/1)

Very successful work

Reading was hit by flu, with over 70 children from one school affected.

Reading
18th October 1918

There is an epidemic of Influenza – number on books 209. Number present this morning 135.

Braywick
18th October 1918

This week three afternoons have been granted for picking berries as the weather became fine and dry. The girls have been very successful at the work.

Hampstead Norreys
18th Oct 1918

The children have picked 168 lbs of blackberries during this week.

Boyne Hill
Oct: 18th

Notice has been received that this school is to be closed [for influenza] from noon today until Nov: 4th.

Log books of Reading ChristChurch CE Infants School log book (89/SCH/7/6); Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); Boyne Hill Girls’ CE School (C/EL121/3)

The picking may go on for another week, weather permitting

Braywick
11th October 1918

Only one afternoon was granted for food picking this week, the weather was too wet, and unsuitable. …

Mr Harris visited on Thursday to ask that the picking may go on for another week, weather permitting.

Maidenhead
11th October 1918

Many of the Jewish children are returning to London.

Warfield
11th October 1918

I have received the copy of a telegram from the Food Controller Reading asking us to continue blackberry picking as the fruit is most urgent.

Hampstead Norreys
11th Oct 1918

The children picked 192 lbs of blackberries during the week.

Riseley Common
Oct. 11th

A wet morning – several children are absent and the Head Teacher fears a return of Influenza.

Log books of Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4); King Street School, Maidenhead (C/EL77/1); Warfield CE School (C/EL26/3); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2); Riseley Common CE School, Swallowfield (C/EL99/3)

For the duration of the war

The harvest was over.

Thatcham
October 4th 1918

The children were taken to gather blackberries. This will be the last time this season – 2 tons 9 cwt 1lb of fruit have been sent away.

Braywick
4th October 1918

Two half days were granted this week for picking berries and the girls got quite a nice supply.

Little Coxwell
Oct 4th

The children are going out to pick blackberrying [sic] for the last time. Registers not marked in the afternoon.

Hurst
4th October 1918

The school managers having given permission, the Education Committee has transferred me to the Three Mile Cross Council School for the duration of the war and Mrs Darlington has been appointed to take charge of this school during my absence.

Chilton
October 4th

A holiday given all day for the children to gather blackberries.

Log books of Francis Baily Primary School, Thatcham (90/SCH/15/1, p. 49); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 205); Hurst C of E Boys School (D/P73/28/23, p. 38); Little Coxwell CE School (C/EL80); Chilton CE School (D/P36/25/1)

Closing early to save coal

Braywick
27th September 1918

On three afternoons this week the registers were not marked, as the girls went blackberry picking.…

Mistress received instructions from the town council to close winter school at 3.30pm in order to save coal.

East Ilsley
27th September 1918

Children picking black berries for the M of food. 50lbs picked and forwarded last time.

Buscot
Sept. 27th

Another blackberrying expedition by older children and 2 teachers; 85 pounds gathered, packed and sent to Faringdon, making a total of 703 ½ pounds.

Hampstead Norreys
27th Sep.

Have closed three half days this week for blackberry picking. We have received & weighed 552 lbs of blackberries this week, making 1540 lbs in 3 weeks.

Log books of Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 205); East Ilsley CE School (C/EL39/1, p. 487); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2)

From the Front to a football match

Some teachers were less enthusiastic than others about letting youngsters spend time picking berries and helping farmers, while soldiers on leave returned to their old school to play current pupils at football.

Windsor
20th September 1918

Eight old boys who are serving in His Majesty’s Forces visited the school this morning and assisted by three of the present scholars played a football match with the school team, the old boys winning by 4 goals to 2.

Braywick
20th September 1918

The classes went for berries on two fine afternoons, on Wednesday and Friday. The results of the pickings are very satisfactory.

Thatcham
Sep: 20th

Registers not marked this afternoon – blackberrying. 198 lbs sent in, making a total for the week of 519 lbs.

Sandhurst
September 20th 1918

Half holiday for blackberry picking. 297 lbs. sent.

Buscot
Sept. 20

Older children went blackberrying in the afternoon; 85 ½ lbs gathered.


Log books:

Hampstead Norreys
1918
20th Sep

The children this week have again been busy picking blackberries. The weather has been very changeable, and we have had to catch an hour or two whenever we could, so that in several cases we have been unable to send the children straightaway, having had to keep them until the blackberries dried. In these cases we marked registers.

We weighed out & paid for 479 lbs of blackberries during the week.

In the limited school time at our disposal we have mostly kept up the Reading Writing and Arithmetic.

Speenhamland
1918
Sept 20th

Attendance poor; four of St VI gone to pick up potatoes for Mr Whitington [sic] – they seem to have got permission from the Authority – Cecil Bishop has also got permission. I do not think this should be.

The school was closed on Tuesday afternoon for the children to gather blackberries but they got very few – only 190 lbs; we shall not go again.

Some of the girls took wood away from Mrs Farquhar’s property, and she wrote an indignant letter to the Vicar and another to myself. I wrote to her, and expressed regret.

Buscot
Sept. 20

Older children went blackberrying in the afternoon; 85 ½ lbs gathered.

Thatcham
Sep: 20th
Registers not marked this afternoon – blackberrying. 198 lbs sent in, making a total for the week of 519 lbs.


Log books of Windsor Royal Free Boys’ School log book (C/EL72/3, p. 193); Braywick CE School (C/EL65/4, p. 204); Thatcham CE School (C/EL53/4); Lower Sandhurst School (C/EL/66/1, p. 448); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2); Hampstead Norreys CE School (C/EL40/2);St Mary’s CE School, Speenhamland (C/EL119/3); Buscot CE School (C/EL73/2)
; Thatcham CE School (C/EL53/4)

Blackberrying again

It was another productive afternoon.

Sandhurst
September 13th 1918

Blackberrying half-holiday.

346 lbs. gathered.

Braywick
13th September

The girls accompanied, by the teachers went berrying on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday afternoons, and secured over 70 lbs which were duly weighted, packed and sent to Mr Harris.

Buscot
Sept. 13th

Older children taken out blackberrying (1.45 pm – 3.50 pm); 67 ¼ lbs gathered and forwarded to central agent.

Lower Sandhurst School log book (C/EL66/1, p.447); Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4, p. 204); Buscot CE School log book (C/EL73/2)

Fruit and nuts in demand

The country wanted fruits and nuts to be collected.

COLLECTION OF FRUIT STONES AND NUTSHELLS

The National Salvage Council are most anxious to get as many of these as possible for the manufacture of a special charcoal for anti-gas masks.

Miss Edith Keevil, of Coley Park, Reading, has undertaken to receive and forward any amounts, large or small.

Last year’s stones (from jams, preserves, etc) are as good as this year’s. All hard fruit stones, including dates, and all hard nutshells, are good; but not green almonds, beech nuts, or fircones. Fruit stones should be kept separate from nutshells. They need not be washed, but should be well dried. Further particulars can be obtained at either Post Office.

COLLECTION OF BLACKBERRIES

So far as this is not being done by individual owners for their own use, this is being organized through the schools. Managers have power to grant occasional half holidays, and of course Saturdays can be used. Children, however, must not go wandering wherever they like without leave, and school parties are to work in organized gangs under their teachers, taking care to do no damage, and to close gates after them. All berries picked under this scheme must be reserved for Government use, and none may be sold. A payment of 3d per lb will be made to the children; and Head Teachers acting as local agents will be entitled to £3 per ton.

Braywick
10th September

Another attempt was made to-day to gather fruit, but a heavy storm came on, and school went on as usual.

Buscot
Sept. 10th

Older children taken out blackberrying in the afternoon; 44 pounds gathered, packed and sent to central agent.

Burghfield parish magazine, September 1918 (D/EX725/4); Braywick CE School log book (C/EL65/4, p. 204); Buscot CE School log book (C/EL73/2)