The procession of July 19th had a unique significance at once more glorious and more tragic than any that has taken place in the long annals of our country

There were celebrations in Windsor.

The month just passed will be noted in the annals of our National History for the public celebrations in thankfulness for the Peace which has now been declared. Saturday, July 19th was appointed as a universal holiday and both in London and in many of the provincial cities pageants were arranged and carried out in a worthy manner. The London pageant was of course the focus of all other celebrations and was carried out with great magnificence. The march of the troops through the main streets, in which all the regiments who had taken part in the war were represented including those of our French Allies, headed by Marshal Foch, must have been a never-to-be-forgotten sight to all who were fortunate enough to see it. Some of us are old enough to remember the Victoria Jubilee processions in 1887 and 1897. Then there was great rejoicing and great magnificence, but the procession of July 19th had a unique significance at once more glorious and more tragic than any that has taken place in the long annals of our country. It represented a triumph which has been won by a whole nation’s sacrifice and heroism. May we be truly thankful for so great a deliverance and more than ever united in the service of God and our country; for thus only can we gather in the Blessings of Peace.

The Windsor celebration consisted of a march of the demobilized soldiers and those of the garrison together numbering about 2,000, together with contingents of lady workers, boy and girl scouts and others who had taken part in home work. Besides this procession there were river fetes, aquatic sports, a torch light procession, a bonfire and illuminations. Notwithstanding the slight rain which set in about mid-day, nothing daunted the enthusiasm of the sightseers, who paraded the streets till the late hours of the night.

Clewer parish magazine, August 1919 (D/P39/28A/9)

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Reviving old organisations and starting new ones

Broad Street Chapel was getting back to normal.

From the various announcements that appear on this and other pages, our friends will see that we are busy reviving old organisations and starting new ones. In addition to those mentioned we are anxious to revive the Young People’s Union and the Boy Scouts, and we hope that before long both may be in full swing again.

Demobilization is now proceeding apace, and our men are beginning to return. We have been glad recently to see once more in our midst, and to welcome “home” Mr T. A. Green, Mr F. W. Warman, Mr J. H. Pitts, Mr Emmett and Mr J. P. Anger. Others are shortly expected, and we hope before long to have them all back.

For some time the operations of the Ladies’ Sewing Meeting have been suspended, but it has now been decided to make a fresh start. The inaugural meeting of a new session will be held in the Institute Room on Tuesday February 18th.

BROTHERHOOD

The Roll of Honour is being brought up to date, and later on we are going to have a permanent one to the memory of our brothers who have fallen in the Great War.

Reading Broad Street Congregational Magazine, February 1919 (D/N11/12/1/14)

Four years and four months of desperate warfare manfully endured rewarded by a victorious Armistice

The vicar of a Maidenhead church was among those who had suffered from the international influenza epidemic.

Dear Friends and Parishioners,

ALAS! for the first time I have to apologize for a late Magazine; but the “Flu” must be my all sufficient excuse. It is indeed, a time of difficulty just now, so many households have illness, and many have to mourn losses; to all these our hearts go out in sympathy. But overshadowing all this is the feeling of a load having been lifted from the mind and heart of the whole Nation on St. Martin’s Day (November 11th). Four years and four months of desperate warfare manfully endured rewarded by a victorious Armistice, to lead, as we all pray, next Spring to a just and abiding Peace. The Civic Service, acknowledging the Nation’s gratitude to Almighty God, held before the Town Hall, was well attended, and I am told by all who heard it how deeply they were stirred by Mr. King-Gill’s Adress. On the same night (Wednesday) full congregations returned our thanks as a Parish to God in St. Luke’s and St. Peter’s…

Then, I have been asked by the Mayoress and Mrs Gardner to remind parishioners of the Lord Roberts Memorial Workshops. These fit crippled sailors and soldiers for earning their living in an independent way. Envelopes will be delivered at all houses, and collected at Christmastide by Boy Scouts. We all hope they may be well filled.

Finally, as regards a Thankoffering by the parish. Many friends have asked me what we mean to do to mark our gratitude for Peace and Victory. I feel that it is almost too early to settle that yet, until Peace is actually signed, or nearer than it is, as yet. Next year, I hope to call a Parish gathering to discuss what form our memorial of the gallant dead, and of the self sacrifice of those who survive, should take. But this year some people feel they would like to give something at once. It has been suggested, and the Churchwardens and I have agreed, that the Christmas Collections should, after deducting £10 at St Luke’s for the Sunday School, and £2 10s at St Peter’s, be given towards the Endowment Fund we are trying to raise to help to maintain the Assistant Clergy…

Lastly, I would ask your prayers for those called on, as Electors, to choose Members of Parliament, and for the New Parliament itself, that all things may be ordered “to the glory of God, the good of the Church, the safety, honour, and welfare, of our Sovereign and his Dominions.”

I remain, Your faithful friend and Vicar

C.E.M. FRY

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, December 1918 (D/P181/28A/

Lining the chancel in memory of a popular athlete

A popular young man, one of the frst to join up in Cranbourne, was remembered.

The news of the death of Lieut. Eric Curtis, 8th Seaforth Highlanders, has been received with much regret in Cranbourne. He was well known here, and much liked by all of us. A keen supporter of the Windsor Forest Athletic Club, he was popular with all the members. He joined the colours in 1914, was severely wounded in 1916, and killed on the field of battle on July 29th.

Our deep sympathy goes out to his wide, and father and mother. A memorial service was held in the church on Sunday afternoon, August 18th. The Boy Scouts attended the service, lining the chancel in front of the choir stalls, and the Vicar said a few words of appreciation of Lieut. Curtis’s character.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, September 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/8)

Saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces

Boys joining the Scouts were not just having fun – they anticipated possible military service.

Several friends attended a Parade of the Windsor Forest Boy Scouts which was held on the Sunday School, on Saturday, June 22nd, when the following scouts were admitted after passing the tests of a tenderfoot. A. Kleinod, H. Hyde, R. Harrington, F. Fasey, J. Robb, A. Johnson, W. Prior, H. Welch, M. Adams, E. Payne. Mr. Asher very kindly presented the badges and Miss Ducat (a Scout Mistress) the certificate of admission. The troop was formed into a semi-circle as each Scout made the Scout’s promise, which is as follows: “I promise on my honour to do my duty to God and the King, to help other people at all times and to obey the Scout Law.” Mr. Asher then addressed the troop with kindly words of encouragement, and said he trusted each Scout would at all times remember their promise. The troop then did some staff and cart drill, and after saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces, the proceedings ended with the national anthem.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

The honourable list of those who have laid down their lives for their country and the right

A Burghfield woman volunteered to help behind the lines in wartorn Serbia.

THE WAR

Honours and Promotions

Mr J Rapley has been appointed “Warrant Mechanician” (HMS Superb)

Casualties

Captain G O W Willink, MC, 2/4th Berks, killed in action, 28th March

Private J W Cox, 1st Royal Berks, died under operation for wounds (April)

William Duffin, Royal Berks, died in hospital (pneumonia)

Albert Hathaway, Royal Berks, killed in action

Corporal Arthur J Pearse, 2nd Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, wounded (April)

The parish will have learnt with sorrow that Captain George Willink was on 5th April reported “missing, believed killed, 23-3-18”. No further official notification has been published at the time of writing; but a telegram has been received from records, and private inquiries confirm it, removing all hope. His name must therefore be added to the honourable list of those who have laid down their lives for their country and the right. A fuller statement will be made in the June Magazine. Meanwhile his father and the family are well assured that they have the sympathy of all their neighbours in this fresh trouble.

Mrs Howard, so well known in the parish for her good work at Holiday House and with the Boy Scouts, has gone out as a motor driver with the Scottish Women’s Unit in Serbia. We wish her a safe return.

Burghfield parish magazine, May 1918 (D/EX725/4)

Playing at soldiers

Berkshire Education Committee was interested in national proposals for a scheme to train teenage boys not yet old enough to join the armed forces. A committee comprising councillor and chair of the committee, H G Willink and Messrs Mansfield and Childs of Reading University reported back. Their main concern was that the men most suitable for running such a programme were away at war, but they also felt that younger boys should not be militarised. Another big issue was the connection between social class and officer status.

Report of Cadet Training Sub-committee to the Education Committee

First report of the Special Sub-committee appointed on 29 April 1916 by the Berks Education Committee to consider the Lord Mayor of London’s “Scheme for the National Organisation of Cadet Training”.

We have met and considered this Scheme; and have also had before us a detailed Scheme of the Essex Education Committee “for the formation and organisation of Cadet Units”.

While not prepared to recommend either Scheme in its entirety, for reasons which will appear, we desire to express our appreciation of the aim underlying both, and to state that in our opinion there is need for some well-considered system by which lads below 18 years of age may not only gain the benefits of discipline but may also undergo a training which will exercise and develop their intelligence. We are convinced that this is essential if the youth of the country is to be adequately prepared either for future naval or military service or to be efficient and useful citizens of the Empire.

The Lord Mayor’s proposals fall under two heads, viz:

1. The establishment of a “National Cadet Council”, with certain relations to other authorities and with a quasi-subordinate system of City and County Cadet Committees…

2. The early introduction of a uniform system of training, upon lines following generally those of the Australian Cadet Scheme (which is established by law) but on a voluntary instead of a compulsory basis.

Under such a Scheme, lads above elementary school age and under 18 would be organised as Senior Cadets, who would receive a minimum of training in Physical Drill, Company (and some Battalion) Drill, Field Training, and Musketry. Boys from 12 to (say) 14, or Junior Cadets, would undergo a training which could only be called military in the sense of being preparation for military work. It would consist of Physical Exercises and Marching Drill, together with any two of the following: Miniature Rifle Shooting, Swimming, Organised Games, and First Aid. Senior Cadets to have a simple uniform, but Juniors none.
As regards the relations with existing formations – OT Corps would not come under the Council at all, the Boys’ Brigade, Church Lads’ Brigade, and YMCA, as well as the Boy Scouts, would remain separate, but close communication between them and the Council would be encouraged; and no objection is raised to lads or boys passing to or from them and Cadet Units, or even belonging to one of them and to a Cadet Unit also.

Note: The Essex Scheme, which contains no reference to the Lord Mayor’s proposals, invites “the co-operation of District Educational Sub-committees, School Managers, Teachers and others, with a view to the formation of Cadet Units”, the membership age to be from that of leaving the elementary school till 19, but no admission after 18….

The Scheme … lays down an elaborate curriculum of instruction, to be given in connection with the Evening Continuation Schools…

One further point may be noted. The Australian lad of 14 receives a “Record Book” in which his military history is entered up to the age of 26 years, and individuals unable to produce a Record Book with a clean service sheet are debarred from any service under the Commonwealth Government. There would, however, appear to be insuperable difficulties in the way of including this valuable feature in any voluntary Scheme, at any rate before the system was in practically universal operation.

Taking the Scheme as its stands, we are of opinion, in regard to the first “head”, that the establishment of some such central consultative body as the proposed “National Cadet Council” is desirable, provided that its functions are in the first instance confined to inquiry, ventilation and discussion; and do not extend to an immediate setting-up of a definite new Scheme, still less to its actual bringing into action.

We give due weight to the objection that the absence on active service, or the employment on other war work at home or abroad, of so many of the men best fitted to construct or introduce a system of such importance is a serious obstacle to arriving at a satisfactory decision upon the best lines for it. But we also feel strongly that the present united spirit of patriotism in public opinion ought to be utilized before reaction sets in, as may very likely be the case when the end of the war comes into sight…

The important point to bear in mind is that no new Scheme can be satisfactory which will not fit into a general plan for National Training for Home Defence, or which will in any way prejudge the question whether such training is to be on a voluntary or compulsory basis….

There are certain points which to us seem fairly clear, and which may be worth stating, if only to elicit discussion.
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“The only thing that really matters is the western front”

Ralph Glyn’s friend Hereward Wake, home on medical lave and visiting his wife’s family in Northumberland, was critical of the way the war was being fought. C W Laird of the shipbuilders Cammell Laird was trying to get a gun manufactured in bulk.

Howick
Lesbury
Northumberland

23 July 1915

My dear Ralph

I hear you are in the Dardanelles. Good luck to you, & write me a line to Courtenhall when you have a moment.

A pity we have dared to ignore the first rule of war & undertake such a job as yours, & we all wish it were feasible to chuck it & bring the troops back to kill Germans.

It seems Warsaw will be German in a few days & possibly Riga too. But these misfortunes will not make the Russians chuck it, and the only thing that really matters is the western front, when by this time we ought to have 2 millions instead of ½ a million. I have been home 3 months, home with neurasthenia, a cursed disease, & I’m still no good. I’m not supposed to write letters, so will finish this now.

I hear John Wynne Finch is back in France.

You were right when you said the war would last some time!

Yours
Hereward

C W Laird
58 Pall Mall
London, SW

23/7 1915

My dear Glyn

My proffered services are still no nearer finding acceptance at the hands of a grateful country. Seriously, if I felt that my leg would stand it, I think [what end] by offering to act as a boy scout at the War Office – a commodity of which they are very short.

As to the gun, I took her to Enfield yesterday again, and she is being again considered. If formally, shall put out for the States and try to get her made unless Govt offer facilities here. Heard as late as the 25th of May that the gun at the front was still doing good service, now with the IXth Div. It strikes me that an individual gun that has kept at it all this time is a pretty good test.

From Paris they are calling for me to go over to show gun. Did in fact go over ten days ago and promised to show the gun again with a nuch lighter tripod stand (3 ½ lbs) which has been designed but is not yet ready, though one has been with gun at front for months. But for Paris the difficulty is getting manufacture.

The bright spot on the horizon seems to be the mere possibility of the taking of A[?] Baba and the Turks despairing of holding on to the further positions.

C W Laird

Letters from Hereward Wake and C W Laird to Ralph Glyn (D/EGL/C31/11-12)

Scouts and the war

The Boy Scout movement had militaristic undertones from the start, and it is no surprise that young men who had been involved with it were among those who joined the services. These Sulhamstead men were typical:

THE SCOUTS AND THE WAR
The following connected with the Sulhamstead and Ufton Scouts are now serving with His Majesty’s Forces:-

W N Carter (Assistant Scout master), Lieutenant, Queen Victoria Rifles, 9th City of London
W G Collings (Assistant Scout Master), 2nd Lieut., King’s Shropshire L. Inf. Territorials
S T Price (Assistant Scout Master), 4th Wilts
Wm Halfacree (Scout), HMS Victory
Wm Tigwell (Scout), HMS Venerable
Ed. Tuttle (Patrol Leader), 1st Berks

Captain Norris, CA (Assistant Scout Master), formerly Church Army Officer in charge of the Lower End is also reported to have joined the Forces.

The following Scouts have volunteered for the Scouts Defence Corps:-

Albert Hannington
George Butler
Alfred Bracey

This list may be further increased.

Sulhamstead parish magazine, February 1915 (D/EX725/3)

Even the Boy Scouts are helping the war effort

Young men and boys from Reading St John were serving the country at home and abroad:

The War
It is difficult to collect the names of all our young men who have gone to serve their country, either in Lord Kitchener’s Armies or in the Territorials. We should be very glad to have their names, with their rank and regiment, to put up with other lists in the church porches.

Many will be interested to know that our old friend, Mr. Frank Tucker has enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery and Mr. Victor Fowler, who was formerly Assistant C.E.T.S [Church of England Temperance Society] Secretary, has joined the Royal Army Medical Corps. Also that Messrs. H.J. Dadley and W.A.H. Coates, prominent members of S. John’s Cricket Club, have joined the Royal Flying Corps, and that Arthur Goodson, who went out a few years ago to Canada, is now in training at Valcartier Camp with the Canadian contingent.

The Scouts
The Troop is going strong and is keen upon rendering any public service in war time. Several boys have done quite useful work already in various ways.

The war meant even history classes were suddenly topical. Girls at a school in Abingdon were challenged by the question of the necessity of war:

9 October 1914
Debate in the afternoon – “Is War necessary?” The Resolution that War is necessary was carried by large show of hands.

Reading St John parish magazine, October 1914 (D/P172/28A/23, pp. 2 and 4); Abingdon Girls CE School log book (C/EL2/2, p. 78)

Scouts and rotters

The vicar of Cranbourne asked why the country was at war, while saluting the young men who had volunteered to serve.

THE WAR
Why are we at war? The answer may be given in the words of Scripture “for righteousness sake.” The Empire is at war
(1) For the sanctity of treaties.
(2) For the support of friends wrongfully assailed.
(3) For the defence of the weak.
(4) For the cause of peace.

Our task is to break the curse which for more than a generation has been blighting civilisation, – the curse of military oppression which has arrested progress, poisoned morality, sucked the life out of religion, and made a mock of every human ideal. This is well put in a short poem by Mr. James Rhoades.

Not for passion or for power,
Clean of hands, and calm of soul,
England at this awful hour
Bids her battle-thunders roll.
That crown’d arrogance may quail
And brute-force be backward hurled –
Lest the hypocrite prevail,
Lest a lie should win the world;
Lest she see the trustful weak
Trampled on by perjured strong –
That her arm may help to wreak
Justice on red-handed wrong,
Till the hierophants of fear
Cease, beneath the darkened sun,
To boom out in Europe’s ear
To grim gospel of the gun.
So, to meet you myriad host
As we muster land by land,
Witness Heaven- no braggart boast-
That for righteousness we stand!
In the dread impending hour
Heedful of that warning word,
“‘Not by my might, and not by power- By My Spirit’ saith the Lord.”

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