Twenty African clergy and teachers are said to have died of hardships in German prisons

The vicar of Reading St Giles was worried about the fate of British missionaries, and local converts, in German-controlled parts of Africa.

NOTES FROM THE VICAR

Zanzibar Diocese

When war broke out in 1914, 42 missionaries of the Zanzibar Diocese were at work in German East Africa, and hardly any direct news of them has since been received. Twenty African clergy and teachers are said to have died of hardships in German prisons. It adds to our anxieties to know that a great number of our African Christians are unshepherded and deprived of the sacraments. Now that a determined attempt is being made to take this, the last remaining colony of the Germans, the dangers and difficulties of our 19 Englishmen and 22 Ladies may be greater than ever.

Nyasaland Diocese

The war has debarred our missionaries from continuing their work on the north-east shores of Lake Nyasa, and the Diocese also is inconvenienced through the commandeering by the British Government of the Mission steamers “Chauncy Maples” and “Charles Jansen.”

To be added to our Intercessions List:

Private Albert Henry Oliver, R.M.A., Lieut. Commander C.J. Benton, R.N.R., Driver J. Cutter, R.E., Sergt. J. Burridge, A.O.C. Bombadier H. Burridge, R.G.A. Gunner G. Moss, R.G.A. Private W. Burridge, Scots. Fusiliers. H. Case, R.G.A.

Missing: Private A. Smith. Wounded: Private S.H.Truss. Private J. Wiltshire. Lieut. G.R. Goodship.

To the list of the departed: Private Sadler, T.J. Seymour, Hyde (R.Berks), E.J.Andrews, Criddle (A.S.C.), Capt. R. Attride (R.Berks).

Reading St Giles parish magazine, September 1916 (D/P191/28A/24)

A bombardier talks to Slough schoolboys

Schoolboys from Slough got a first hand account of life in the trenches. Bombardiers were non-commissioned officers in the artillery.

September 6th 1915
Bombardier Calmer on leave from the Front visited the school and talked to the Top Class boys.

Stoke Road School, Slough: log book (89/SCH/28/1)

An awful experience

Although Berkshire was spared the fear of air raids, many local people had friends and relatives ho were directly affected. A former District Nurse in Longworth, who had left the area on her marriage, shared her frightening experiences with her old friends.

We think the following extract from a letter from Mrs Poole, dated May 13, (better known to us as Nurse Dora Sheldon), will interest our readers. It is written from her home at Maldon.

“It was marvellous how we escaped the Zeppelin raid here as we did. The bombs were dropped so near us, and our drawing-room window was blown out and the bottom of a bath shared the same fate. It was an awful experience. And the nights are very nasty. The place has to be in absolute darkness; such a business to exclude every scrap of light.”

We congratulate Bombardier Richard Painton on his promotion to the rank of Sergeant.

Longworth parish magazine, July 1915 (D/P83/28A/10/7)