These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War

A final list of the Wargrave men who served in the war. NB: where this symbol † appears in the list, an entry for this soldier exists in the corresponding supplement to follow.

ROLL OF HONOUR.

These served their King by land or sea from the Parish of Wargrave during the Great War.

Additions and Corrections for this Roll should be sent to the Vicar as soon as possible.

Adby, L.
Adby, C.
Adby, W.
Adby, O.
Alderton, F. J.
Allen, C. W.
Allum, H.
Amos, G.
Andrew, H.
Arnold, A. E.
Arnold, W.
Attlesey, H. F.
(more…)

Subjects closely connected with the War

Food shortages had led to a soup kitchen for children in Ascot.

The Lantern Services in the Parish Room on Fridays at 7 p.m. are being taken by the Rector and deal with subjects closely connected with the War. There was a very fair attendance at the first service, and it is hoped that it will increase as the services become more generally known.

By the effort of the Teachers a Soup Kitchen is being started as the Schools for the benefit of the children, and we are sure many parents will be most grateful for this help in this difficult days. The Managers have made a small grant towards utensils, and gifts of vegetables, or offers of personal help will be welcomed by the Teachers ….

At a War Savings Conference held at the Reading Rooms, Sunninghill, on Wednesday, February 20th, it was resolve to form a local War Savings Committee for the district to be known as “The Sunningdale and Ascot District War Savings Committee”, its chief object being to establish as many new Associations as possible in the neighbourhood, the ladies and gentlemaen elected being Mr. Percy Crutchley (Chairman), Messrs. H. J. Whitehead and A.J. Merton (Hon. Secretaries), Col. Blackburn, (Hon. Treasurer), Mrs. Ninian Elliott, the Hon. Miss Gordon, Mr. E. Wolseley, Heresy Marchioness of Linthgow, Mr. G. J. Francis, Mr. F. J. Patton, Mr. C.W. Searle, Mr. J.W. Abbott, Mrs. Trotter, Mr T.A. Woods. The Committee was given power to add to its number, and it was intimated that if Sunningdale cared to join up with this Committee, the inclusion of this parish would be cordially welcomed.

The Ascot War Savings Association has just completed one year’s working. The total number of certificates sold during that time being nearly 1000.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)

Hoping to establish as many new War Savings Associations as possible in the neighbourhood

Ascot and local aristocrats contributed financially.

At a War Savings Conference held at the Reading Rooms, Sunninghill, on Wednesday, February 20th, it was resolved to form a local War Savings Committee for the district to be known as “The Sunningdale and Ascot District War Savings Committee”, its chief object being to establish as many new Associations as possible in the neighbourhood, the ladies and gentlemen elected being Mr. Percy Crutchley (Chairman), Messrs. H. J. Whitehead and A.J. Merton (Hon. Secretaries), Col. Blackburn, (Hon. Treasurer), Mrs. Ninian Elliott, the Hon. Miss Gordon, Mr. E. Wolseley, Hersey Marchioness of Linlithgow, Mr. G. J. Francis, Mr. F. J. Patton, Mr. C.W. Searle, Mr. J.W. Abbott, Mrs. Trotter, Mr T.A. Woods. The Committee was given power to add to its number, and it was intimated that if Sunningdale cared to join up with this Committee the inclusion of this parish would be cordially welcomed.

The Ascot War Savings Association has just completed one year’s working. The total number of certificates sold during that time being nearly 1000.

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, March 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/3)

Wargrave’s roll of honour

Wargrave was one of many parishes to publish a list of men serving in the parish magazine. This allowed parishioners at home to pray for them all by name.

‘The Roll of Honor for the Parish of Wargrave

The Royal Navy
Bywater, Darol. Lieut. R.N.D
Grey, Thomas Robinson. Sub-Lieut., R.N.A.A.V.C.
Blackburn, Ernest. H.M.S. Glory
Bucker, J. H.M.S. Laurel
Carr, Joseph, Fireman. Transport
Clarke, William. H.M.S. Laconia
Coleman, Charles William. H.M.S. Glasgow
Doughty, Albert. H.M.S. Irresistible
Doughty, Arthur. H.M.S. Tartar
Doughty, Herbert. H.M.S. Queen Mary
Doughty, Horace. H.M.S. Donegal
Doughty, John. H.M.S. Hindustan
George, Walter. H.M.S. Agamemnon
Haskett, Bernard. H.M.S. Jason
Haycock, Charles William. H.M.S. Ajax
Hollis, Alfred John. H.M.S. Implacable
Jemmett, Leonard Oakley. H.M.S. Galatea
Mayne, Frederick. H.M.S. Britannia
Parritt, Edward. H.M.S. Defiance
Pauline, Leonard. H.M.S. Hebe
Payne, William. H.M.S. Britannia
Pugh, Charles. H.M.S. Hibernia
Sandleford, James. H.M.S. Mars
Waldron, Jesse. H.M.S. George V.
Waldron, William. H.M.S. Dido

George, William. Royal Marines, H.M.S. Agamemnon
Pugh, Herbert. Royal Marines, H.M.S. Prince George
(more…)

“The crack of bombs and the whistle of the bullets”

There was news of a number of wounded men from Ascot. One, Augustus Turner, wrote an illuminating letter about his experiences under heavy fire in the trenches.

We have to record, with regret, the following casualties during the past month.-
Harry Cooper (R. Middlesex Regiment) wounded, now at the Northern General Hospital, Sheffield.
Corporal of the Horse Harry Bonnard (1st Life Guards) wounded.
Captain Sidney Clement (5th Australian Bush Regiment) missing.
James Johnson (1st Life Guards) missing.
Rifleman Augustus Turner (London Irish Rifles) wounded, now in Woolwich Hospital, progressing favourably.
Ernest Oran (1st Life Guards) sick.
Thomas John Minns (1st Batt. R. Berks) wounded.

We give some further extracts from Rifleman Augustus Turner’s interesting letter from the Front.-

“In the evening, by which time we had got accustomed to the noise of bullets and shells and conditions in general, I was one of a party to go sapping. This experience will ever remain in my mind. A sap or a trench had already been dug a distance of about 50 yards from our first trench towards the Germans, and it was our duty to dig still further. I entered the sap first, and when a short distance along a star shell was sent up by the Germans. I’d been warned to keep low when any star shells were sent up so as not to be seen. I did bend down, but almost immediately after the star went up a bomb followed and exploded in the air above me. I don’t remember whether I laid full length on my own accord or really how I got down, but after the bang I found myself lying on my spade measuring my height and a little more perhaps, at the bottom of the sap. The explosion was terrific, it shook the ground and me too, but apart from that I was uninjured. This is just another form of a greeting of the Germans, but in a very short while the crack of bombs and the whistle of the bullets from our men and the ‘Germs’ which passed just above my head, had not the slightest effect and I worked on merrily, smothering myself with clay and throwing above that which didn’t stop on my clothes. It seems strange, but it is quite true that one gets accustomed to the worst of conditions in a very short while.

The sapping continued all night, reliefs taking place of course, and at 3.30a.m. on 12th March, I finished my duty in the sap, when an order was given ‘Rapid fire.’ It continued for an hour, and such a noise is hard to beat. An attack from the Germans was about to take place, but was repelled by this deadly fire. A fellow who dare risk being out in the open under such fire deserves V.C.’s all over him. Just before this hail of lead, an attempt to blow up the trench next to ours by mines, was made; the earth blew up high in all directions, in front of the trench. This made another tremendous report. Morning began to dawn, and things quietened down a bit, and at 9.a.m., on the 12th March we went from the trenches back to our base, after having an experience, which I think, none of us will ever forget.

Our stay in barracks was not for long, for on 13th March we were ordered back to the trenches again for a stay of 24 hours. It is pitiful to see some of the houses- which used-to-be. In villages near the trenches it is one mass of ruin; churches, too, are included. All that remains of what must have been a fine old church is half of the tower. An extraordinary thing in one of these wrecked villages is a beautifully constructed shrine by the roadside. It is practically untouched excepting for a bullet hole just here and there. Needless to say, it attracts everybody’s attention. Our Sunday service was conducted last Sunday in a modern theatre, built 1912. Holy Communion was celebrated at 8 a.m. on the stage of this theatre, but there not being sufficient room we had to remove the pit. This may strike one as being very curious, but I can say from experience a theatre can be turned into a very fine church. Our chaplain, who is a very pleasant gentleman, officiated.

The soldiers here seem fine fellows. They all look very fit and not a tiny bit perturbed through the war. Fighting has not the tiniest effect upon them apparently. That ‘Use is second nature’ seems perfectly true. This war is a fearful thing, but it is giving us all such an experience and bringing upon most of us such a fine condition of health that if we are spared to see it through we can never forget it. I am indeed sorry to hear of the outbreak of disease at the Ascot Hospital, but am more sorry to know of Miss Blackburn being a victim. I truly hope it will be very soon suppressed. I trust, sir, that my letter will not be boring to you, and in conclusion, I would like to say that I’m longing for the day when I can enter Ascot’s dear old church and thank the Almighty for deliverance and protection from and through this awful and terrible war.

With best wishes for your health and well-being.

I am, sir, yours faithfully,

AUGUSTUS T. TURNER.”

* *

A WORKING PARTY has been held (usually at the Rectory) from August to December, and is now going on. In the first instance the work and a contribution in money was sent to Queen Mary’s Needlework Guild. At the present time we are working for the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (Scottish Women’s Hospitals.) Pyjamas, slippers, and hot water covers are out chief contributions. Units are in France and Serbia. The sun of £41 13s. 3d. has been sent in money: and we have an “Ascot bed” in one of the Hospitals.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine (D/P151/28A/17/6)

The “fun city”

Ascot was affected by the war in various ways: hosting a big hospital, losing teachers to the armed forces, and so on. A couple of the men who had joined up wrote home with their impressions of life at the front:

THE MILITARY HOSPITAL is closed for the present for the purpose of carrying out some necessary alterations. We have sustained a great loss in the death of Miss Blackburn, the Commandant of the Ascot Voluntary Aid Detachment, and of the Hospital. Her absolute unselfishness and devotion to her work endeared her to all who had the privilege of knowing her.

ASCOT SCHOOL.
MR.B.G.GIBBONS, Assistant Manager in the Boys’ School, has volunteered for Military Service. He will be much missed in the Church Choir, as well as at the Schools. His post will be kept open for him: and we shall welcome him back, if all is well, when the war is over.

THE WAR is at its height. It is difficult to turn our thoughts to anything else. Our faith in the justice of our cause, and our humble confidence that GOD will further the efforts of those who are fighting not for personal gain but for the Christian ideal of righteousness and honourable dealing, make us as sanguine as to the ultimate issue. But, in the meanwhile, the strain is terrible. Not only our deep recognition of the magnificent self-sacrifice and courage of our navy and army, but our prayers on their behalf, must increase more and more in their earnestness every day. On Wednesdays at 8 p.m., as well as on Sundays, special intercessions are offered in the All Saints Church.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.- Nearly 180 names are entered upon our All Saints Roll. The following extracts from letters to the Rector will be read with interest.

(i) From Lance-Corp. ARTHUR T. N. JONES.

At present we are billeted at a farm, and sleep in a barn about 60 N.C.O.s and men. Things of course are a little more rough and ready out here… We find the pack rather more trying now that we carry everything, including “Emergency Ration”: but we are very fit on the whole, and one feels far more at home with things after the first few days.

(ii) From Pte. AUGUSTUS T.TURNER.

It was about 6 p.m. on March 9th that the first half of our Battalion said au revoir to England. I shall never forget just those few moments. It was glorious, yet a very sad time. We lined the side of the boat facing the landing stage, and shouted “good bye” to the others on shore. To add to the impressiveness of the departure, our pipers played us away with “Auld Lang Syne” “The wearin’ o’ the green,” and other Irish airs. Those were glorious moments and in fact made one feel throaty…

On April 8th we first marched up to the “fun city.” While on the march and near our destination, shells began to whistle over our heads, just as a greeting I suppose… We seemed to go through miles and miles of trench before arriving in the firing line. The first half day was very quiet, excepting for the continual whiz of shells. You really would be astounded to see what trench life is like. It is almost as safe in a dug-out as you are in England. Of course, one has to chance a shell coming there, but rifle shots have no possibility of hitting you. The place where we were was a very important front, and seemed impregnable. The huge solid parapets of earth sand bags, the dug-outs, and trench itself, are marvellous.

***We have no more space for further extracts in the May Magazine from this most graphic and admirably written letter of our Ascot “lad” Gus Turner (if we may still call him so). But we will quote further from his letter in the Magazine for June. He tells about a German star-shell and its effect upon himself. And he tells of the Holy Communion celebrated early on Sunday mornings on the stage of a modern theatre. But you must wait till the June Magazine.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magzine, May 1916 (D/P151/28A/7/5)

“It was glorious, yet a very sad time”

Ascot churchgoers were confident in the rightness of the cause in which the war was fought, but feeling the strain – as were the men at the Front.

ASCOT

THE MILITARY HOSPITAL is closed for the present for the purpose of carrying out some necessary alterations. We have sustained a great loss in the death of Miss Blackburn, the Commandant of the Ascot Voluntary Aid Detachment, and of the Hospital. Her absolute unselfishness and devotion to her work endeared her to all who had the privilege of knowing her.

ASCOT SCHOOL.

Mr B G GIBBONS, Assistant Manager in the Boys’ School, has volunteered for Military Service. He will be much missed in the Church Choir, as well as at the Schools. His post will be kept open for him: and we shall welcome him back, if all is well, when the war is over.

THE WAR is at its height. It is difficult to turn our thoughts to anything else. Our faith in the justice of our cause, and our humble confidence that GOD will further the efforts of those who are fighting not for personal gain but for the Christian ideal of righteousness and honourable dealing, make us as sanguine as to the ultimate issue. But, in the meanwhile, the strain is terrible. Not only our deep recognition of the magnificent self-sacrifice and courage of our navy and army, but our prayers on their behalf, must increase more and more in their earnestness every day. On Wednesdays at 8 p.m., as well as on Sundays, special intercessions are offed in the All Saints Church.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

Nearly 180 names are entered upon our All Saints Roll. The following extracts from letters to the Rector will be read with interest.

(i) From Lance-Corp. ARTHUR T. N. JONES.

“At present we are billeted at a farm, and sleep in a barn about 60 N.C.O.s and men. Things of course are a little more rough and ready out here…

We find the pack rather more trying now that we carry everything, including “Emergency Ration”: but we are very fit on the whole, and one feels far more at home with things after the first few days.

(ii) From Pte. AUGUSTUS T.TURNER.

“It was about 6 p.m. on March 9th that the first half of our Battalion said au revoir to England. I shall never forget just those few moments. It was glorious, yet a very sad time. We lined the side of the boat facing the landing stage, and shouted “good bye” to the others on shore. To add to the impressiveness of the departure, our pipers played us away with “Auld Lang Syne” “The wearin’ o’ the green,” and other Irish airs.

Winkfield District Magazine, May 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)