The first great military award gained by a Winkfield man

A number of Winkfield men had been wounded or were unwell.

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING

We regret to learn that Pte. Jack Dean has been wounded with a bullet wound through the left leg. He is in hospital in England and writes cheerfully, so we hope he is doing well.

Pte. George Benstead has been moved from the hospital in France to England. He writes to the Vicar that he is so much better that he hopes shortly to be home and able once more, for a time, to take his place in the choir again.

Pte. Fred Holmes, Pte. W. Franklin, and Pte. C. Jenden have also been wounded; they have been in England some time and are now convalescent.

Pte. C.E. Burt has been seriously ill with rheumatic fever, but is better, and we trust now out of danger.

Pte. Fred Blay joined the Army Service Corps last month and Fred Knight joined H.M.S. Impregnable.

Corporal Reginald Nickless and Privates Leonard Cox and George Faithful, having recovered from wounds or sickness have returned to the front, also Private Norman Nickless has gone out, and we trust all will find a place in our prayers.

Most of us have heard with great pleasure and satisfaction that the Military Medal (and promotion to Lance-Corporal) was won by Edwin Gray for gallantry on July 1st at Deville Wood. This good news ought to have appeared in the August Magazine, but though now belated it is fitting that a record be made in the Parish Magazine of what is, we believe, the first great military award gained by a Winkfield man, and we heartily congratulate Lance-Corporal Edwin Gray and his relatives on this distinction.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, October 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/10)

“Rendered unconscious for 48 hours by the bursting of a trench mortar within a yard of him, and suffering from nervous shock”

Winkfield men continued to suffer.

PARISH NOTES

OUR MEN WHO ARE SERVING.-

We deeply regret to have to record that to our list of those who have laid down their lives for their country must now be added Gunner Joseph Church, who was killed in action at the end of July. Our hearts go in sympathy to his bereaved parents and relatives, and a Memorial Service was held for him on the evening of Sunday, August 27th.

Yet more of our men have been wounded, but we are thankful to know that the wounds are comparatively slight and all are well.

Pte. Ernest Faithful has been wounded in the knee.

Pte. George Benstead has a shell wound in the knee, and is in hospital in France.

Pte. Walter Reed was rendered unconscious for 48 hours by the bursting of a trench mortar within a yard of him, and is suffering from nervous shock, but he is now out of hospital on short leave home, and we trust that time and rest will soon set him up again.

Pte. Albert Fletcher has joined 9th Royal Berks Regt., and Pte. Frank Simmonds the Durham Light Infantry.

Our prayers are asked for Pte. Charles Edward Burt, who left his wife and children in Canada to come over and do his bit for the old country, and is now at the front, and also for his brother William Burt, who went out to France last month and is now in the trenches.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/9)

Two more men have laid down their lives

There was sad news of more Winkfield men.

PARISH NOTES

Two more men from our parish have laid down their lives for their country. Private Ernest Thurmer (2nd Royal Berks) and Private Frank Payne (2nd Life Guards) were killed in action in May.

Memorial prayers were said for Ernest Thurmer on Sunday, June 13th, and for Frank Payne on Sunday, June 27th.

We trust that many will remember in prayer and sympathy their sorrowing relatives.

Privates George Benstead, Fred Holmes and Wallace Nickless of 5th Royal Berks, and Walter Woodage of 5th Royal Fusiliers have just gone to the front and will we trust be remembered in our prayers.

Private Harry Ottaway (3rd Dragoon Guards) is wounded in the hand and leg, but is doing well in hospital.

Private Albert Carter (1st Royal Berks) is in hospital and there is good hope that the leg will be saved.

Corporal Horace Blunden (2nd Life Guards) was wounded in the leg; the shrapnel bullet has not yet been extracted, but he is now out of hospital, and we were glad to see him in Church on June 20th, and wish him a speedy and complete recovery.

Private John Williams’ long illness has not yet taken a turn for the better, and since his relapse his condition has been critical. All our sympathies must go out to his family in the long strain of this anxiety.

We have to more names to add this month to our list of Honour, George Faithful and Ernest Faithful having joined the 3rd battalion of the Royal Berks.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/5)