Reading School’s contribution to the war

A complete listing of Reading School’s alumni who had served in the war.

OLD BOYS SERVING IN HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES.

This list has been compiled from information received up to December 14th, 1918; corrections and additions will be welcomed and should be addressed to: – R. Newport, Esq., Reading School, Reading.

Allnatt, Rifleman N.R. — London Rifle Brigade.
(killed in Action).
Ambrose, 2nd Lieut. L.C. — S.L.I.
Anderson, Pte. L.G. — Can. Exp. Force
Appelbee, 2nd Lieut. T. — 13TH West Yorks.
(Killed in Action).
Atkinson, Lieut. E.G. — Indian Army
Atkinson, Capt. G.P. — 6TH Royal North Lancs.
Atkinson, 2nd Lieut. J.C. — R.A.F.
Aust, 2nd Lieut. H.E. — Yorkshire Regt.
(Twice Wounded).
(Killed in Action).
Aveline, Lieut. A.P. — Royal Berks Regt,
(Wounded).
(Military Cross).
Baker, 2nd Lieut. A.C.S. — R.G.A.
Baker, Rifleman A.E. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Rifleman R.S. — London Irish Rifles.
(Wounded).
Baker, Lieut. T.H. — 8TH Royal Berks Regt.
(Wounded)
Balding, Capt. C.D. — Indian Army.
Banks, Pte. W.R. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Bardsley, Capt. R.C — Manchester Regt.
(Wounded).
Barnard, F.P. —
Barroby, Trooper. F. — Strathcona Horse.
Barry, Capt. L.E. — R.A.F.
Baseden, Lieut. E. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Baseden, 2nd Lieut. M.W. — R.A.F.
Batchelor, Lieut. A.S. — Duke of Cornwall’s L.I.
Bateman, Capt. W.V. — Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Bayley, 2nd Lieut. F. — Chinese Labour Battalion.
Beckingsale, Pte. R.S. — Canadian Contingent.
Beckingsale, Capt. R.T. — Tank Corps (Military Cross).
(Wounded).

Belsten, E.K. — R.A.F.
Biddulph, 2nd Lieut. R.H.H. — Royal Berks Regt.
(Died of Wounds).
Bidmead, Pte. — Wilts regt.
Black, Pte. F. — Public School Corps.
(Killed in Action).
Blazey, A.E.H. — R.A.F.
Blazey, 2nd Lieut. J.W. — Royal Berks Regt
(killed in Action).
Bleck, Lieut. W.E. — R.F.A.
Bliss, 2nd Lieut. A.J. — Leinster Regt.
(Killed in Action).
Bliss, Pte. W. — 2ND Batt.Hon.Art.Coy. (more…)

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Naturalization to be overhauled

Sir George Cave, the Home Secretary introduced plans to revoke citizenship from some naturalised Britons.

12 July 1918

Read long debate about aliens. Sir G. Cave made speech. End up German banks – not open for some years after war. Naturalization to be overhauled….

Letter from Phyllis from 4 London General. Thinks she will like it.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale of Bisham Abbey (D/EX73/3/17/8)

“The knowledge that one was lessening the incredible sufferings and hardships our soldiers and sailors were hourly undergoing”

The war was putting a catastrophical strain on the country’s financial position.

WAR SAVINGS
A Successful Meeting

It is not always that a meeting passes from the academic into the practical, and the conveners and chairman of the meeting held at S. Giles’ Hall, London Street on Friday 3rd November are to be congratulated upon having achieved this.

The Vicar the Rev, F.J.C. Gillmor. M.A. , introduced the speaker, Mr. A.T. Tudor, by confessing that he himself was anxious to become a member, and see an association formed, as the necessity for such Associations everywhere was apparent.

Mr. Tudor, representing the local committee, of which the mayor is chairman, briefly outlined the objects of the National Committee, which he stated was formed as an outcome of recommendations made in the report of the committee on War Loans for the small investor dated January last, its objectives being:

1. To stimulate the sentiment and urge the need for economy.
2. To promote the formation of War Savings Associations.
3. To secure for the nation, through these associations, a certain amount of the money required for the prosecution of the War.
The year’s estimated national expenditure up to the 31st March next is 1825 millions, that is 5 millions a day, and as the pre-War amount was roughly only 200 million [per year], it was clear that unless everyone in every sphere lent a hand to help produce the remaining 1,600 millions the treasury was faced with unnecessary anxieties.

Mr. Tudor confessed that he objected to the “don’t” leaflets of the national committee and urged that English people should be left to arrange their own economy’s [sic], beginning when health and efficiency were secured. It was clear however that the possibilities of small savings were immense, as evinced by the 10 million raised by these associations, during the month of August, and locally also some 30 associations were already harmoniously working.

Apart from the attractiveness of the investment, which was an easy first in the history of any country anywhere at any time, there was the knowledge that one was lessening the incredible sufferings and hardships our soldiers and sailors were hourly undergoing for us all. This in itself should bring everyone in.

The fleet was mobilised the army was mobilised, and now it remained for the money to be mobilised.

The central committee were anxious to get in touch with everyone willing to help encourage and promote War Savings Associations, for their autumn campaign included activities from which it was hoped that every school, firm, factory and religious body be gathered in.
Mr Tudor instanced the valuable work done in certain departments of the Great Western Railway Company’s Works.

The meeting was unanimous in passing the following resolution, and the following were nominated and accepted office in the Association:

Chairman: Rev O.F. Spearing, M.A.
Secretary : Mr. Rowe.
Treasurer: Mr. A.T. Higgs.
With a most useful committee.

Resolved: That this meeting of S. Giles’ parishioners ; appreciating “that the obligation to provide in one way or another all that is necessary for the purposes of the war is a command to all citizens,” welcomes this opportunity for the forming an association forthwith;to be called the “S. Giles Parish War Savings association.”

It was hoped to obtain permission of the Governors of Reading Savings Bank for members to pay in there, and some 20 members promptly paid their initial subscriptions there and then.

In case this should meet the eye of anyone wishing to join who was not present at the meeting, the Hon. Secretary, Mr Rowe, will welcome the opportunity of sending them a card.


Reading St Giles parish magazine, December 1916 (D/P96/28A/33)

“They got more than they bargained for”

Ralph Glyn’s married sisters, Meg Meade and Maysie Wynne-Finch, wrote to him after his brief leave. Meg lived in London and was acting as Ralph’s financial proxy while he was away. Maysie, who was staying with her sister, told Ralph all about her husband’s wound. Neither woman was a fan of British politicians.

Oct 15th
23 Wilton Place
SW

My darling Ralph

It was very sad returning here with the babies on the 12th to find you had gone. If only you could have stayed a few days longer here, it would have been perfect. But I am hoping always that we shall have you back very soon. If you don’t come straight back here, I’ll never never forgive you!…

Bless you for your letter you wrote to me before leaving London. Jim [her husband] loved getting the maps… Anne [her daughter] has drawn you a sunset & has written you a letter which I enclose “For Uncle Ralph at Darnelles” she said.

I went to Cox this morning & saw your old friend Mr Smith. He was very kind to me, & I have a cheque book to draw on your account, so look out!

And in accordance with your long & interesting letter I got from you today, I have only been mixing with Cabinet Ministers today. That’s all. I took your letter to Sir Edward Carson to Eaton Place. Instead of putting it in the letter box I thought I’d go one better & give it to the butler so I rang the bell. The door opened & out stepped Bonar Law & Sir Edward! I mumbled to the latter “This letter is from my brother Ralph Glyn” & fled, however Sir Edward insisted on shaking me warmly by the hand, & your letter has evidently been too much for him, because all the papers have been remarking on his conspicuous absence from the Cabinet meeting today.

Things do look serious. The best news I’ve heard since war began, I heard at dinner tonight at the [Somertons?]. There was a nice man there called Baker Kerr who said he knew you, but what tickled me was that he said that we should have conscription in 6 weeks time. I hope to Heaven it’s true. Things have been bungled & enough misery caused by the selfish stupidity & timidity of politicians. I hear that the Zepps have strict orders not to drop any bombs on Whitehall or Downing Street for our Government are Germany’s best friends.

What a bore for you being hung up in Rome… Don’t pull the noses of any of the irritating Dips who are there either, if you can help it. They must be perfectly maddening to deal with…

Dad … tells us a Zepp passed over Peter[borough] last night, & did a lot of harm at Hertford, killed a lot of people, & smashed up the town. The Zepp raid here on Wednesday night was quite amusing. I was in the middle of writing a letter to Dickie when the guns started firing. So I collected the babies & we went to the kitchen till it was over. Of course I went out to try & see the Zepp, but I can’t say I succeeded. I saw confused shadows in the searchlight, but I did see the bursting shell from our guns, but most other people seem to have seen the Zepp & say there were 4 of them or 5….

Maysie tells me she has protected me by sending you all the news…

Your always lovingest
Meg

(more…)