A good moon

The Winkfield war memorial was under consideration.

February

PARISH MEMORIAL TO THE FALLEN.

A Public Meeting to discuss ideas and plans for erecting a suitable Memorial for Winkfield men who have died in the war, will be held in the Parish Room, on Wednesday, Feb. 12th, at 8 p.m.

There should be a good moon on that night, and we hope it will be a fine evening, and that as many as possible will attend.

March

PARISH MEMORIAL OF THE FALLEN

Notice of a Public Meeting to be held in the Parish Room, on Wednesday, Feb. 12th, in order to discuss ideas and plans for erecting a suitable memorial for Winkfield men, who have died in the freat war, was given in the February number of the Magazine; but unfortunately was printed so late that only a few received it in time to learn of the meeting, and the attendance was small.

The following resolutions were however unanimously passed:

(1.) That this meeting cordially approves the suggestion for a worthy and permanent memorial for the men of Winkfield who have made the supreme sacrifice during the War.

(2.) That whatever else may be done, a brass Memorial Tablet, inscribed with the names of Winkfield men who have fallen in the War should be set up in the Church.

Discussions took place as to the best form any further memorial should take, and three ideas was mooted.

(a.) That a Memorial Cross should be erected opposite the lych gate of the churchyard.

(b.) That the Parish Room should be improved and made more adaptable for meetings, entertainments, and all purposes of a village Institute.

(c.) That this parish should join with others in helping to enlarge the Ascot Cottage Hospital which is a great benefit to the District.

A Committee consisting of the Vicar and Wardens, Lord George Pratt and Messrs. S. G. Asher, and G. Brown and H. Harrison, was appointed to fully consider these proposals in all their bearings, and then to report to a public meeting to be called later.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February-March 1919 (D/P 151/28A/11/2)

Advertisements

Saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces

Boys joining the Scouts were not just having fun – they anticipated possible military service.

Several friends attended a Parade of the Windsor Forest Boy Scouts which was held on the Sunday School, on Saturday, June 22nd, when the following scouts were admitted after passing the tests of a tenderfoot. A. Kleinod, H. Hyde, R. Harrington, F. Fasey, J. Robb, A. Johnson, W. Prior, H. Welch, M. Adams, E. Payne. Mr. Asher very kindly presented the badges and Miss Ducat (a Scout Mistress) the certificate of admission. The troop was formed into a semi-circle as each Scout made the Scout’s promise, which is as follows: “I promise on my honour to do my duty to God and the King, to help other people at all times and to obey the Scout Law.” Mr. Asher then addressed the troop with kindly words of encouragement, and said he trusted each Scout would at all times remember their promise. The troop then did some staff and cart drill, and after saluting the Roll of Honour of Old Scouts now serving in H.M.’s Forces, the proceedings ended with the national anthem.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, July 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/6)

“100,000 tonnes of potatoes could be added to the food supply of the Nation”

Winkfield people hoped communal effort would help with food shortages.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION.

Mr. Asher has generously presented a spraying machine for potatoes for the use of the parish, but though it was ordered by the Association 5 or 6 weeks ago it has not yet arrived. When it comes it is hoped that we may be able to have a demonstration on the allotments in Winkfield Row and make arrangements whereby the machine can be used to the best advantage.

The Board of Agriculture assert that if small growers of potatoes in England and Wales would spray their crops this year, 100,000 tonnes of potatoes could be added to the food supply of the Nation.
The Association has also taken steps to try and insure that an adequate supply of coal shall be available next winter for those who cannot store coal in large quantities in the summer, and they have applied to the Coal Controller for leave to buy 250 tons at once. No reply has yet been received, but we hope to be able to state that this effort has been successful and give full particulars of the terms on which the coal can be bought next winter.

Owing to War conditions it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep our Choir up to anything like full strength in either men or boys. We should therefore welcome any assistance from the congregation, and in the hope that it will lead to more hearty congregational singing we ask all able to do so to attend the short practices which will be held in the Parish Room every Sunday evening at 6 o’clock.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, July 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/7)

The importance of spraying potatoes this year

The latest technology was put to use to maximise food production.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION.

On June 29th a meeting was held at the Men’s Club, Winkfield Row, to discuss how the best use could be made of Mr. Asher’s generous gift of a spraying machine for use in the parish. The Vicar presided and explained the importance of spraying potatoes this year. A working Committee was elected, and anyone wishing to utilize their services should inform Mr. T. Beal without delay.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/8)

The gravity of the situation and the imperative need for all to carry out the instructions of the Food Controller

Various kinds of savings were pursued in Winkfield – but there were concerns as to how poorer people would cope.

WINKFIELD WAR ASSOCIATION.

The Committee organised a Public Meeting in the Parish Room on Friday, March 30th , when there was a large attendance.

Mrs. Boyce gave an excellent address on the Food question, pointing out clearly the gravity of the situation and the imperative need for all to carry out the instructions of the Food Controller, especially as regards to bread; and the point was emphasized that although the labouring man who could not afford so much meat might legitimately take a larger allowance of bread, yet he is now bound to reduce his usual amount by at least one pound a week.

Mr. Creasy also spoke on the importance of War Savings, and proposed the following resolution which was seconded by Mr. Harrison and carried “that all present pledge themselves to co-operate in carrying out the regulations of Lord Devonport and the Authorities on the question of rations to households generally, and to support the War Savings Association to the best of their ability”.

The Committee learning that many Cottagers and Allotment holders found great difficulty in obtaining seed potatoes arranged to buy a ton of seed at once, and Mr. Asher kindly advanced the money to secure them. Most of these potatoes have now been applied for, but a few pecks are still available, and any wishing to buy them should apply to Mr. C. Osman, Winkfield Row.

Arrangements have been made for the saving of waste paper; sacks have been taken by Mr G. Brown, Maiden’s Green, Mr. Eales, Winkfield Street, Mr. C. Osman, Winkfield Row, Mr. Langley, Brock Hill, Mr. Osman, Gorse Place, and also at the Schools, and it is hoped that many will send contributions of waste paper (old letters, circulars, newspapers, but not brown paper) to help fill these sacks which will then be collected and forwarded.

Winkfeld section of Winkfield District Magazine, May 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/5)

All patriotic people recognise that they should spend as little as possible on themselves at the present time

Winkfield people were encouraged to join a new war savings movement.

WAR SAVINGS.

It is hoped that we may be able to form in this parish a War Savings Association, and so a meeting to discuss a scheme and, if possible, start a local Association, will be held on Friday, March 16th, at 7 p.m. in the Men’s Club Room, Winkfield Row.

All patriotic people recognise that they should spend as little as possible on themselves at the present time, so as to be able to lend what they can save to the Nation to help to pay for the war, and a War Savings Association enables members to purchase the 15/6 War Savings Certificates on better terms than they could do as individual investors.

WAR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION

A meeting to discuss the formation of a War Savings Association and a Parish War Society was held at the men’s Club Room on Friday, March 16th, when there was a good attendance.

The Vicar put forward some suggestions for rules to form the basis of a Parish War Society, the objects of which should be to promote the production of more food, to encourage thrift and saving and the loyal carrying out of the Food Controller’s requirements. Mr Burridge, who kindly came from Bracknell explained the working of a War Savings Association, and a motion by Mr. Asher was carried that a Committee consisting of Messrs. G. Brown, H. Harrison, C. Osman, J. Street, and the Vicar, should be appointed to go into these matters and take the necessary steps for the formation of a War Savings Association.

The Committee met the next day and decided to apply at once for affiliation to the National War Savings Committee for a Winkfield War Savings Association, with the Chairman the Vicar, Treasurer Mr. C. Osman, Secretary Mr. Tipper.

Arrangements have been made to receive payments on Mondays at 7 p.m. at the Club Room, Winkfield Row, by Mr. Tipper; on Saturdays at 10 a.m. at the Parish Room by Mr. King; or parents with children at the Schools can send their money to be received by Miss Harris.

The Secretary will be glad to furnish full information to any applicants.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, March and April 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/3-4)

Muffler making in Cranbourne

Cranbourne children were knitting for the troops.

Mrs Asher has most kindly provided wool for the Day School children who are working for her weekly working party. The children since November have made 119 mufflers, 10 pairs of socks, and 2 pairs of mittens.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/2)

It is hoped that everyone who wishes, may be able to assist

The many groups of women offering their sewing skills to support the war effort were becoming more tightly organised.

BERKSHIRE COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF VOLUNTARY WORK ORGANISATION (Approved by the War Office.)

The County has been divided up into eleven districts to assist the War Office to carry out their scheme of organising voluntary effort for the supply of garments, etc. for the Troops, and Hospital requisites for the sick and wounded.

The Lady Haversham has undertaken to organise the Easthampstead District, consisting of the parishes of Easthampstead, Warfield, Winkfield and Cranbourne, Binfield, Sandhurst, Crowthorne and Ascot.

Mrs. Ferard has been appointed the head of the group comprising Winkfield, Cranbourne and part of Ascot.

To carry out the scheme effectually, weekly working parties have been organised at Winkfield Manor, also by Mrs. Asher at Ascot Place, and by Mrs. Burdekin at the Sunday School, Cranbourne. In this way it is hoped that everyone who wishes, may be able to assist.

Badges will be granted to workers, who, for not less than three months have been actively engaged in work under the scheme.

From time to time the War Office sends to the Red Cross Depôt at Reading, lists of the things required, which lists are circulated by Lady Haversham among the different working parties.

As to the cost of the material; this has to be provided out of private donations; sums, however small, will be most gratefully received by Mrs. Ferard and by Mrs. Burdekin.

Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, March 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/3)

In this sad time of war it is not fitting to have pleasure parties

Children at Cranbourne and Winkfield were not allowed a Christmas party this year – but they did get a cash gift in lieu.

Cranbourne

Mr. Asher came to the School on Thursday, December 16th and most kindly presented each child with a new shilling. He told the children that in this sad time of war he and Mrs. Asher felt that it was not fitting to have pleasure parties, and that therefore they were not asking the children to tea as in former years. He expressed the hope that the children would deposit the money in the Savings Bank, for by so doing they would be helping the country in carrying on the war.

Colonel the Hon. H. C. Needham proposed a very hearty vote of thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Asher for their most kind gift.

Winkfield

As a rule we have an account of the School Treat to give in this month’s Magazine, but war has caused a change in this as in so many other things, and we feel that the parents, and even the children, except the youngest, will recognise that Mr. and Mrs. Asher were right in thinking that at this sad time of war it is hardly fitting to hold pleasure parties and therefore the usual treat would not be given.

In order however to allay the pangs of disappointment Mr. Asher most kindly gave a new shilling to every child. He presented these at the School on Dec. 16th, and in a few kind words impressed on the children the duty which rests on us all to be as economical as possible and save all we can, and to do something to help our Country to win the war.

Mr. Ferard proposed a hearty vote of thanks to Mr. and Mrs.
Asher for the kind thought and generosity which inspired their gift.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, January 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/1); Winkfield section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/2)

This war and its terrible stress forces men to face reality

The vicar of Winkfield noted that some churches were full under the stresses of war – which he expected to last at least another year.

VICAR’S LETTER.

MY DEAR FRIENDS,

Soon after you get the February Magazine Lent, which falls very early this year, will have begun with its call to thoughtfulness and self-examination. And surely this War Year, the solemn Lenten Season will more than ever have its special message for all, and will be a “Call to Worship” to many who have neglected its opportunities in the past.

Our Nonconformist brethren have for some time been organising a “come to Church” campaign, and in most places attendance at public worship has largely increased, because this war with all its terrible stress and anxiety and forces men to face realities and is teaching us to look at the higher issues of life. May we then try to learn the lessons God would teach us by this trial and resolve to make a better use than ever before of this coming Lent; use to the full all the opportunities of public worship and make it a time of specially earnest private prayer for our brave Sailors and Soldiers, our Parish and our Country.

The calls on us during this time war are great, but I hope we shall not allow our usual Lenten self-denial savings purses for the Waifs and Strays to suffer; and that many will apply to the parish clerk or to myself for these purses.

Your sincere Friend and Vicar,

H. M. MAYNARD.

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR.- A new list, kindly written out by Mr. Empson, has been made up to date and placed in the Church porch; the list now contains 60 names the following having been recently added:-

Bert King, Reginald Knight, Godfrey Loyd, Vivian Loyd, J. Franklin, Frank Payne, Leonard Tipper, Edward Still, Claud Williams, John Williams.

RED CROSS SOCIETY. – Since the war began the following articles have been forwarded from the Winkfield Branch to the Berkshire Branch at Reading.
140 day shirts, 72 night shirts, 29 bed jackets, 77 pairs of socks, 14 helmets, 16 pairs of operation stockings, 44 belts, 136 bandages, 29 pairs of gloves, 20 pairs of mittens, 5 pairs of bed socks, 9 comforters, 37 cushions.

Up to January 1st the Berkshire Branch sent out 2630 shirts; socks, 2790 pairs; vests, 1688; comforters, 540; night shirts, 700; mittens, 530; bed socks, 650. Of these a large number has been received by the Berkshire Regiment.

A satisfactory feature has been the large number of articles made by the mothers at Mrs. Ferard’s working parties. The value of the articles amounts to £55. To this, kind contributions have been given by Mrs. Asher, Mr. H. P Elliott, Lady Finlay, Mrs. Wilder, Mrs. Hayes Sadler, Mrs. Blakiston, Mrs. Louise Holt, Mrs. Ferard, Miss Thackrah.

It is hoped that further contributions may be received, for the work must not stop. So far as can be seen the stress of war will last another year at least and will seriously affect all of us remaining in England. But we should make every effort not to neglect those who are fighting for the defence of our lives and homes.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)

Entertaining soldiers

More Territorial soldiers from Kent had been in east Berkshire over the winter and were now moving on.

Ascot
TERRITORIALS.
A large number of our Territorials, to our regret, left Ascot for Chatham on January 26th. They bought with them unaccustomed brightness to our ordinarily quiet Ascot. They are a fine, well-conducted body of men, and all Ascot wishes them GOD speed. The Army Service Corps still remains with us for a time. We understand that a contingent of Lord Kitchener’s Army may be shortly expected here.

Cranbourne
The West Kent Territorials left us on Tuesday, January 26th . They introduced into what has been described as “this dull village of Winkfield” a certain liveliness. We do not imagine we are able to compete with the “resources of civilisation” of a town like Maidstone; still we all tried to do our best to mitigate the alleged dullness.

The Sunday School was converted into a Recreation and refreshment room, water was laid on, gas stoves introduced, games and newspapers provided, concerts arranged, and the “inner man” was generously catered for. Mrs. Creasy and Mrs Maywell-Williams devoted a large part of each day to the commissariat. Their labours were much appreciated, at any rate by the soldiers, who very often expressed their thanks. Other ladies from this Parish and from Winkfield and Ascot were in attendance from 4 to 7 p.m. each evening, and the members of the C.E.M.S. and their lady friends took their place from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and, helped by the Scouts, washed up and generally tidied the room after the soldiers had left. The cost of preparing the room and the expenses connected with the lighting, heating and cleaning the room amounts to about £20, towards which the following subscriptions have been received: Mr. Asher, £5; Mrs. Barron, £2 1s. 0d; Col. Cross (for newspapers), 10-; Mrs. Foster, £1; the Misses Ravenhill, £1.

The Cranbourne Reading Room in North Street was also thrown open to the Soldiers without charge, and there they met with a hearty welcome. Several ladies in the neighbourhood also provided concerts and entertainments.

We are grateful to those Soldiers who so kindly helped us in the Choir at the Parade Service and at Matins and Evensong.

Ascot and Cranbourne sections of Winkfield District Magazine, February 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/2)

The joy of giving, the sorrow of loss

Cranbourne churchgoers mourned the loss of a brilliant officer, while even the children were helping to support soldiers from the area.

All our heartfelt sympathy has been given to Mrs. Phillips and Miss Phillips in their great loss. Major Edward Hawlin Phillips D .S. O., R. F. A., was an officer with a brilliant record, and his friends looked forward to a still more brilliant future for him, but in the Providence of God he has been taken. R. I. P.

SUNDAY SCHOOL.
The Sunday School has been turned into a Reading and Recreation Room for the Soldiers. Tea and refreshments are to be provided each evening. Sixteen ladies are to be in charge from 4. p. m. to 7 p. m. and the members of the C.E.M.S., assisted by the Scouts, from 7. p. m. to 9 p. m. many kind gifts of games, tables, papers &c., &c., have been received from Mr. Asher, Colonel Cross, Mrs. Foster, Mrs. Edwards, the Misses Ravenhill, Mrs Barron, Mrs Goldfinch.

* * *
We are trying to do what we can to give a little pleasure to our Soldiers at the Front. The Sunday School children wish to experience the joy of giving, they have undertaken to look after two men in the 28th Battery R. F. A., 9th Brigade, 7th Meerut War Division.

The children being their pennies and half-pennies each Sunday, and in this way we are able to keep our two soldiers supplied with little comforts every week. We have already sent two parcels, and we hope soon to hear of their safe arrival.

During the next few months, while we are unable to use the Sunday School we shall be glad if the children will bring their money to Church in the afternoon, and Mrs. Burdekin will receive it after the service.
* * *
The following is a list of the names of old Scholars of our School who are now serving in His Majesty’s Forces:-

A. Brant, E. H. Brant, A. Cox, W. Cox, E. Curtis, W. L. Clarke, C. Goodchild, G. A. Hawthorn, F. Harris, T. W. Harris, J. Herridge, E. Mapp, C. Platt, W. Reed, C. Reed, W. Woodage, G. Watts, T. A. Ward, G. Weston, G. Walls, L. Walls.

Cranbourne section of Winkfield District Magazine, December 1914 (D/P151/28A/6/12)