“Our pride and gratitude for the work so gloriously completed by our naval and military forces”

There were mixed feelings in Ascot as the war’s human price was still an open wound.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers’ Committee have decided that efforts must be made to let every man from our parish serving overseas receive a Christmas present and a message assuring him of our pride and gratitude for the work so gloriously completed by our naval and military forces. Arrangements have already been made for the sending of such presents by registered letter post, so that if not delivered they may be safely returned and presented to any who may have already returned home.

To raise the money required, the R.A.F. have most kindly offered to arrange a special performance in their Cinema, probably on Wednesday, December 11th. Please look out for the announcement and make sure that no seat is left vacant. Members of the Committee will be calling upon relatives to ascertain the latest addresses of the men abroad.

We congratulate Sergt. C.C. Parsons on the great distinction of receiving a bar to his military medal.

The Managers have decided to devote the money which would have been expended on prizes during the past three years, on a Christmas Entertainment for all the Children before the conclusions of hostilities.

While we are all full of thankfulness for the great victory, it is a specially sad to have to record the death of yet another Ascot man, who has died whilst serving his Country. George Smith, for many years in the service of Sir Charles Ryan, died in a military hospital at Tidworth, and was buried at Ascot, on Nov. 23rd. When he was called up for the R.A.F. last summer there were many who doubted whether he was strong enough for a soldier’s life, and our deepest sympathy goes out to his widow and little daughter.

We are glad to hear that George Maunder, who is suffering from gas poisoning, is making progress towards recovery, and we hope that this is the last casualty we shall have to record. We pray that very soon those who have relatives prisoners of war may be relieved of their anxiety, and that we may all share in welcoming them home in safety.

Ascot section of Winkfield and Warfield Magazine, December 1918 (D/P 151/28A/10/10)

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Show that we appreciate what they are doing for us

Ascot parish worked hard to keep in touch with its men serving overseas.

ASCOT SAILORS’ AND SOLDIERS’ COMMITTEE.

This Committee, which was formed over two years ago, endeavours to keep in touch with all Ascot men serving in the Navy and Army abroad, and to show that we appreciate what they are doing for us. In order to keep the records up to date it is important that all information and changes of address relating to the men be at once communicated to any of the following members of the Committee.
High Street: A.F. Bullock, H. Woods. London Road: H. Goswell. Fern Park Road: A. Tustin. Swinley and Priory Road: J. Skelton. New Road: H. Charman, A. Morton. Kennel Ride: A. Woods.

We deeply regret the loss of Charles Sharpe and Victor Wye, killed in action, and our sympathy goes out to their relatives.

Mrs. Paxford and family wish to thank their kind neighbours and friends for their gift and sympathy in the great bereavement.

The following are reported wounded: E.H. Beasley, C. Everett, R. Strut.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, November 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/11)

Lemonade crystals for the troops

Ascot soldiers and sailors received regular parcels from home. The contents included concentrate to make a fizzy lemon drink.

ASCOT SAILORS’ AND SOLDIERS’ COMMITTEE.

The object of this Committee is to keep in touch with every Ascot man who is serving his Country abroad, and to show appreciation of what he is doing. Correspondence is kept up with the men and parcels are sent out periodically.

Recently, parcels have been sent out to 101 men, namely:

10 in the Navy, consisting of book, pipe and socks. 63 in the B.E.F., consisting of matches, candle, bootlaces, towel, lemonade crystals, soap, pipe, and 1/4lb. of tobacco.

28 in the M.E.F. and India, consisting of lemonade crystals, socks, pipe, 1/4lb. of tobacco and tinder.

In sending these the Committee have found a number of changes of address, and several additions to the number of men serving. In future, in order to avoid disappointment, it is important that any changes should be at once notified to any member of the Committee or to Mr. W.H. Tottie.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, September 1917 (D/P151/28A/9/9)

“Our Heavenly Father is enriching this parish with heroes of self-sacrifice”

There was news of several Ascot men, including a report by one man of life as a prisoner of war in Germany.

THE WAR

We have to announce that Charles Edwards has laid down his life in the service of his country. Ascot has real reason to be proud of him. Upright, courageous, a communicant of the Church, a member of a family universally respected, he leaves behind him not alone our heartfelt sense of sorrow for the withdrawal of a true and noble young life, but an ideal to be reverently set before us of what a GOD fearing young Englishman can attain to. Our Heavenly Father is enriching this parish with heroes of self-sacrifice, even unto death. May we humbly value to the utmost so priceless a dowry. The whole district should be raised to a higher level of life by the example and the prayers of young men of the type of Arthur Jones and Charles Edwards. R.I.P.

OUR WOUNDED.

Victor Edwards (brother of the above), Reginald Smith and Arthur Taylor are reported wounded. All three are doing well.

THE ASCOT SAILORS’ AND SOLDIERS’ COMMITTEE state that since the commencement of the war 136 in all appear to have gone abroad from Ascot in the service of their country, and of that 110 are now serving abroad. 15 are in the Navy, 72 reported in France, 16 on the Mediterranean, 1 in Mesopotamia, 4 in India and 2 prisoners. Parcels were sent in June to those who appeared to require them: and similar parcels are now being sent, and in addition special parcels are now being sent to those in the Navy. The thoughts of all of us will go out to those in France at this strenuous time.

AT MOST of our Garrisons in England there are no Army Churches, and efforts are now being made, with the approval of the Deputy Chaplain-General, to raise a Fund for building a Church at Bordon Camp, near Aldershot, in memory of the Great War, and as a memorial to those who have fallen. Donations to this Fund will be gratefully received and acknowledged by W. H. Tottie, Esq., Sherlocks, Ascot.

ASCOT PRISONERS OF WAR.

We have good news from our Prisoners, who write to say they receive their parcels regularly and in good order. The following quotation from Private Richard Taylor (imprisoned at Friedrichsfeld-bei-Wesel) may interest our readers. (The letter was accompanied by the photograph of a beautifully kept burial ground and its large stone central cross. Each carefully tended grave was thickly planted with flowers and had its headstone with an inlet cross and inscription.)-

“I am sending you a photo of the monument which lies in the graveyard of our dead comrades, English, French, Russian and Belgian, who have died since they have been made prisoners. The money was raised by having concerts and charging from ten to forty pfennigs (otherwise from a penny to four-pence.)”

The letter continues: “One night we were playing a nice game at whist, and a parson came in and had a chat with us, and asked us if we should like to go to Church. Of course we all agreed, and on the same night we marched down to the village to Church and spent a very nice hour. And the parson is an Englishman, but he is allowed a passport to travel about Germany. He had some books with the short service, and some well-known hymns in them.”

Ascot section of Winkfield District Magazine, August 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/8)

“What scenes our Ascot fellows are witnessing! And what adventures they will have to tell us of when they happily return!”

There was exciting news from some of the Ascot men serving at sea and in Egypt.

THE WAR.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers Committee report that they sent Easter cards to all the men abroad, and presents to all those who appeared likely to require them, the number sent being 27. They regret to say that no news has been received of the three Ascot men who have been reported missing for some time, though every effort has been made to trace them. They also report with much regret that three wounded men have been discharged from the Army. Four more men have gone out abroad this month, making the total on the list 101.

Signalman Tindal of H.M.S. “Undaunted” has been home on short leave and has given a graphic account of the action in the North Sea off the Danish Coast, in which his ship took a prominent part. For fear of the Censor we must not print all of what he told us, but we may say that the action took place in a high gale and that the rescue of all the “Medusa’s” crew was an exciting episode and carried out with great skill. The German destroyer rammed by the “Cleopatra” went down with all hands, and she sank so quickly that nothing could possibly be done to save them.

A very interesting letter from Trooper Skelton of the Berkshire Yeomanry has been received from Egypt by his parents. He took part in the recent round up of the “Senussi” tribe on the frontiers of Tripoli and also witnessed the release of the British prisoners in the hands of the Arabs. What scenes our Ascot fellows are witnessing! And what adventures they will have to tell us of when they happily return!

The Committee hope that they may be able to hold a Concert in May for the benefit of the Fund, as it requires some replenishing.

Ascot section of Winkfield District magazine, May 1916 (D/P151/28A/5)

Appeal to the obstinate hens

Ascot people supported their servicemen in various ways, including an appeal to increase giving of eggs for wounded soldiers – even if this meant what looks rather like cruelty to the hens.

ASCOT HOSPITAL EGG LEAGUE.
Eggs are needed, greatly needed for the patients at the Ascot Military Hospital. Former donors are once more asked to remember the wants of our wounded and invalided soldiers, fresh donors are appealed for. Eggs (dated), may be left, as formerly, every week (not later than Thursday evenings) at the depôts:- Mr. Taylor (Grocer), New Road, Mr. Skelton, Fernbank Road, Mr. Charlton (Baker), London Road, Mr. John Abbott, Course Road, and the Rectory. They may also be sent direct any day to the Hospital, where the Gate Orderly will receive them till the Hospital re-opens in March. Do not be put off by the obstinancy [sic] of your hens (as to laying eggs) if they turn a deaf ear to all your appeals, even on patriotic grounds. But keep a cabbage or such like savoury morsel tied up just out of reach. This is an appeal to their senses that seldom fails to make their beaks water, and to engender a constant jumping exercise most efficacious to an abundant production of eggs. It is specially suitable where the runs are small and consequently space is cramped. Names of fresh donors will be thankfully received by Miss La Trobe-Bateman, Ascot Rectory.

The Ascot Sailors and Soldiers Committee report that they have now on their list 92 Ascot men who are serving their Country either in the Navy, or in Regiments at the Front in France, or in the Mediterranean. As there are a good many more who are still on duty at home, this number will be considerably increased from time to time, and the Committee would be greatly obliged if information regarding those transferred to the Front may be given as soon as possible to any member of the Committee, or sent to Mr. Tottie at “Sherlocks.”

It has not so far been found necessary to send parcels to the men in a general way, as so much is being done for them from other sources, and it has been rather the aim of the Committee to ascertain the special needs, and to endeavour to satisfy them. In this way some 20 parcels of different articles were sent out at Christmas, and further parcels will be sent out as they appear to be required, and it is hoped shortly to send a present to each man at the Front from the “Boys of Ascot” as a result of their concert.

Correspondence with all those who wish it is being carried on, and many letters have been received, all showing that the men are in excellent spirits and health, and they are all glad to receive news of Ascot.

The Committee also wish to do anything they can to help the wives and families of men serving in any difficulties they may have arising out of the war, and they hope that they may be informed at once if assistance in any way is required.

A special fund is available for prisoners of war, but fortunately there are only two from Ascot.

Ascot section of Winkfield District Monthly Magazine, March 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/3)

A spontaneous effort on the part of Ascot School lads

Schoolboys in Ascot organised a concert in aid of gifts for the troops.

ENTERTAINMENT (by boys of the Ascot Schools) – in aid of our “Ascot Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Comfort Fund,” on Wednesday, February 23rd, 1916, at All Saints Parish Room.

Part I. Miscellaneous (Songs, &tc.)
Part II. A Musical Burlesque.

*This is a spontaneous effort on the part of our Ascot School lads, supervised by Mr. A. Tustin, who have felt somewhat handicapped as to the special bit that, for their part, they can put into the War.*

There will be two performances –
at 2.45p.m. (2/6, reserved : 1/- : 6d.)
at 7.30pm (1/6, reserved : 1/- : 6d.)

Ascot section of the Winkfield District Magazine, February 1916 D/P151/28A/8/2