“War is dreadful, but Peace is terrible”

An army doctor was a leader in the temperance movement.

An Open-Air Meeting in connection with the St Luke’s Branch of the CETS was held in the Vicarage Garden, on Tuesday evening, June 10th, under the Presidency of the Rev. T H Thurland, the Vicar being away on holiday. The Chief Speaker was Dr Harford, General Secretary of the CETS, who first distributed the certificates, etc, won by the Band of Hope members, the handsome Challenge Banner for the Maidenhead Band of Hope competition having been won by North Town.

Dr Harford, in his address, spoke chiefly to interest the large number of juveniles present. He told them of his service for nearly four years as an eye specialist in France, and related many incidents and told of the scenes of destruction and military activities. He next quoted the remark of M. Clemenceau, French Prime Minister, that “War is dreadful, but Peace is terrible”. This meant that when at war we had got but one thing to do – to see we got it through; but in Peace everybody began to fight everybody else we had first to make a good Peace, not only in Paris, but also at home. He urged the young people to do all they could to fight against the evils caused by drink, one of the greatest curses of our land. The Doctor related an interview with the Archbishop of Canterbury relative to the coming big campaign of the CETS, the “Merrie England” Movement, in which the Society would send cinemas and lecturers around the country to give an impetus to better housing and or enlightened action as to food, health and thrift. The Society was anxious that everybody should have happy homes – not only good, decent houses, but real happy homes. As to cooking, the Doctor had a severe shock when, on asking a little boy if he liked nice puddings, and taking for granted the inevitable “Yes”, the little boy frankly replied “No, sir!” The Doctor’s point was that if the wives would only give their husbands plenty of sweet puddings, the men would not care for so much beer, in which they found the sugary element. In the new homes of Merrie England the children must be taught to play games.

Dr Harford later told some experiences as a missionary for many years in West Africa, where he was nearly eaten by cannibals. An effort was being made to suppress the use of gin out there, this spirit being the buying and selling “coinage” of the country. – (Laughter). As part of the “Merrie England” Movement, every parish was being asked to arrange a little pageant play already published as part of the local Peace celebrations; and he hoped the Maidenhead CETS would carry this out.

Reprinted from The Maidenhead Advertiser.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, July 1919 (D/P181/28A/28)

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More useful at school than in the army

The headmaster of the church primary school in Warfield looked likely to escape military service, as he was not fit enough to go to the front.

10th May 1916

I was attested for military duty at Bracknell on December 10 and reported myself at Reading Barracks on May 6. The military doctor placed me in category 11 Field Service at Home. A letter from the Berkshire Education Committee received this morning says that the recruiting officer will not call me up without reference to the Board of Education Whitehall. It is the opinion of the military authorities that I am more useful at school than I would be if taken for Field Service at Home.

Warfield CE School log book (C/EL26/3, p. 342)

People must put up with the varied trouble which arose out of the war

Medical services at home were disrupted by the loss of doctors who had gone to treat wounded soldiers.

At a meeting of the executive committee held in the parish room on Tuesday May 2nd 1916 …

Mrs Minchirn asked if any difference was to be made for non subscribers who owing to Dr. Courtney’s absence at the War were obliged to have Nurse.

The Rector said he considered all parishioners could and should subscribe, the subscriptions were so small. The difficulties with regard to medical assistance were only some of the varied trouble which arose out of the war and people must try to put up with them. This subject however had perhaps better come up later on when one saw how it all worked.

Agreed.

General Committee Minutes of Binfield District Nursing Association (D/QNA/BI1/5)

Sir Charles Ryan on the war

Sir Charles Ryan (1853-1926) was an Australian military doctor. He had been invalided to England from the Dardanelles, and gave a lecture to girls at a Berkshire school. Perhaps he showed them some of his photographs of the Dardanelles campaign.

29th July 1915
Sir Charles Ryan gave the girls a short address on the European war.

Ascot Heath Girls School log book (C/EL109/2, p. 244)