“One chaplain has been wounded in the face and lost the use of one eye, and is wearing the Military Cross, so evidently has been in some very hard fighting”

An army chaplain from Maidenhead was part of a group of padres heading for new flocks at the front.

Letter from the Rev. J. Sellors.

Dear Friends, –

I am writing this in the train somewhere in Italy, and shall not be at my destination for several more days. I have slept on the train for eight nights, but three companions and I in the compartment have managed to make ourselves fairly comfortable. There are four officers or six men to each compartment, and even at this stage of the journey, although travelling has been tiring, everybody seems to be in good spirits. This partly due to the excellent weather we have had; we have had continual sunshine for over a week, and have been passing through vineyards, olive yards, orange groves, etc., sometimes through mountainous scenery, sometimes by the sea-side, so there has been much to interest us. Some of the towns are quite fascinating in this part of the country. Many are built on a hill, and they appear to be on large compact building, but on closer inspection we can see narrow streets dividing the town into separate parts. All the houses are whitewashed and have flat roofs, and the brilliant sunshine gives them a dazzling appearance.

There are six Chaplains on the train – three Roman Catholics and three Anglican, all going to different places; one has been wounded in the face and lost the use of one eye, and is wearing the Military Cross, so evidently has been in some very hard fighting.

My thoughts often dwell on the time I spent at Maidenhead, and I pray that God will bless the work that is done in His name in St Luke’s Parish. I am in the best of health, and look forward eagerly to the great work to which I have been called.

Feb. 9th, 1918.

Your sincere friend, J. SELLORS, C.F.

Maidenhead St Luke parish magazine, March 1918 (D/P181/28A/27)

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