German PoW on the run “is alleged to have drawn a formidable looking dagger (which was afterwards discovered in a rick where the fugitives had been hiding”

Three Germans PoWs on the run were foiled by the brave actions of a Berkshire policeman and three Special Constables.

6 July 1918

CHIEF CONSTABLE

Lt-Col Poulton attended the Committee and stated that he had been absent from his Police work for three years, and he thought it was time he returned to such work; that his Army work was now so organized that it could be easily carried on by some other officer; and that he had now reached the age of 60; and suggested that the Secretary of State be asked to apply to the War Office for his relase from Army Service to enable him to resume his duties as Chief Constable of the County, as from 31 August, 1918.

Resolved:
That the Secretary of State be asked to make the application to the war Office as suggested.

Resolved also on the motion of the Chairman [J. Herbert Benyon] and seconded by Sir R. B. D. Acland, knight: That the very best thanks of the Committee be accorded to Col. Ricardo for services rendered as Acting Chief Constable.

Capture of three escaped German prisoners

The Acting Chief Constable has brought to the notice of the Sub-committee the action of PC 105 Reginald Jordan, stationed at Burghfield, and of Special Constables Webb, Holland and Hill, in effecting the capture of three Prisoners of War who had escaped from Bramley Camp on 24 April 1918.

PC Jordan challenged these men whom he met at Burghfield at midnight, and, finding they were foreigners, attempted to arrest them. After a struggle in which one of them is alleged to have drawn a formidable looking dagger (which was afterwards discovered in a rick where the fugitives had been hiding), the Germans succeeded in escaping, but were discovered and recaptured the following evening by PC Jordan – with the assistance of the Special Constables above-named, who had been working indefatigably all day in search of them.

The Military authorities sent £4.10s.0d as a reward, which was apportioned as follows: PC 105 Jordan, £2; Sergeant Taylor (who had also assisted) and the three Special Constables, 12s.6d each.

MOTOR CARS

The two motor cars which were so kindly placed at the disposal of the Superintendent at Maidenhead and Wokingham at the commencement of the war by the late Mr Erskine have now been returned to the present owner, Mrs Luard of Binfield Grove, and I beg to recommend that a letter expressing the gratitude of this Committee for the use of the cars, which have been of very great value to the Police, be sent to that lady.

I should also like to take this opportunity of referring to the loss sustained to the Force by the death of the late Marquis of Downshire, who, as a Special Constable from the commencement of the war, had kindly placed his valuable time and the use of his two cars (free of any charge) at the disposal of the Superintendent of the Wokingham Division, and by this means saved the County a great deal of expense.

I recommend that a letter be written to the present Marquis from this Committee, expressing regret at the death of his father, and its appreciation of his generous services.

The present Marquis of Downshire has very kindly placed his car at the disposal of the Superintendent at Wokingham on condition that the County keeps the car insured, [and] pays the licence duty and cost of running.

Berkshire County Council and Quarter Sessions: Standing Joint Committee minutes (C/CL/C2/1/5)

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The cost of food and other commodities has more than doubled since the commencement of the war

Berkshire policemen were given a pay rise to cope with war conditions.

21 April 1917

The Clerk referred to the death of Lieut-Col Thorne, the Deputy Clerk of the Peace, who had been killed in action near Arras on 9 April, while in command of a battalion of the Royal Scots.

Resolved on the motion of Lord George Pratt, seconded by Sir R. D. Acland, knight, KC: That a letter of condolence be sent to the widow of rhe late Deputy Clerk of the Peace.

Police Constable 212, Frederick Charles Kimmer, has been called upon to join the Army, being under 23 years of age.

War Bonus

The cost of food and other commodities which has more than doubled since the commencement of the war, is being felt very seriously at the present rate of pay and bonus. The rate of pay of a Constable on joining, together with the 3/- war bonus, amounts to 26/11 per week, in addition to the incidental advantages he obtains in the way of clothing, boots, rent, rates and pension, and, in the case of single Constables, bedding, fuel and light.

Information has been obtained from all the County forces in England … and, placing the wages and war bonus with others… Berkshire compares very unfavourably with others… only 6 county forces coming beneath it.

Taking everything into consideration, the Committee recommend the following extra war bonus to all ranks .. to commence from 1 April, 1917, be payable until three months after the conclusion of the war…

32 per week for each member
1s per week for wife
6d per week for each child under the age of 15 years

It is estimated that the extra cost would be about £2,550.

Adopted.

Standing Joint Committee minutes (C/CL/C2/1/5)

The horrors of this war will lead the nations back to God

Windsor women who belonged to the Anglican Mothers’ Union were invited to a lecture on the war.

The Mothers’ Union

Mrs Bosanquet very kindly invited a meeting of Mothers’ Union workers to the Bank House on February 7th, when the Hon Lady Acland have a very beautiful and thoughtful address on “Some Lessons of the War”.

It is impossible, she said, to explain the reason for the permission of evil in the world: to reconcile God’s love with the horrors of this war. It cannot be done in logical terms: our only way is to look for the good through all the pain and suffering; to realise that they lead to the glory of Sacrifice. And it is certain that these are a great purifying force, leading the nations back to God: for they all, with the one great exception of Russia, had fallen away from God during the years of peace…

Prayer and Sacrifice – they are the duty of us all. God accepts the sacrifice our men are making, and He will accept that of our girls, too, for whom life will be a more serious, and in many ways a harder, thing than ever before. Through all the sorrows and the changes the truths of God stand fast, like the Crucifixes of which we read, that remain unharmed in the battlefields of Flanders.

New Windsor St John the Baptist parish magazines, March 1916 (D/P149/28A/21/1)

Line still unbroken, with Indian troops in reserve

Not only did Florence Vansittart Neale have to lose a footman to the armed forces, her daughter Elizabeth (nicknamed Bubbles or Bubs) was going to nurse the wounded.

28 August 1914
Sent off my recruit, George Bennett our 2nd footman…

To Windsor to find rooms for Bubs & May [Turner?]. Got them opposite hospital. Brought back dear little cat, most friendly….

Fussed over hospital clothes. Mrs [Beever?] & Mrs Acland came to tea – she also running hospital at Welwyn….

Meeting at Vic: [illegible] about National Relief Fund.

Fierce battle still going on. Sir J French says line not broken. Fighting against much larger numbers. Line still unbroken. This going back rather. Fear heavy casualties. Another army ready, & Indian troops.

Diary of Florence Vansittart Neale (D/EX73/3/17/8)