‘How the words of a war memorial – “There shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying” – can be true in the face of present facts’

A war memorial was unveiled in Clewer.

St. Agnes’, Clewer

Our wayside Memorial of the Fallen, which was dedicated on July 4, appeals very strongly to those who have seen it. This is a great satisfaction to the many who have contributed towards it: and numbers from a distance who have passed by have been much struck by the beauty of the Figure. Several people, not connected with each other, and who have seen many another wayside Crucifix, have volunteered the remark “I have never seen such a beautiful Figure.”

We are most grateful to Canon Eliot for having come over to dedicate the Memorial, and on one of the wettest days too, that even this July has brought us: but providentially not so much as a drop of rain fell during the time of service, though it came on again immediately afterwards. So were the goodly company who mustered in honour of the Fallen rewarded for braving the elements: and it was cheering to have with us the Rector, the Warden of the House of Mercy, Mr. Warlow, and our other good friends.

Some have expressed wonder how the words over the Cross – “There shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying” – can be true in the face of present facts, thinking that the words apply to what ought therefore to be here and now. But they tell of what will be, not now, but hereafter when the Crucified shall come in the greatness of His glory: and the present widespread sorrow which death all around is bringing into so many homes makes the more striking that comforting truth, revealed by Jesus Christ after His triumphant return to His Own Home in Heaven, that the time is most surely coming when for ever this shall be no more. The record of this revelation by Jesus Christ to St. John, which took place in the year 96 on the island of Patmos, is Revelation XXI.4.

Others have asked the meaning of the letters “I.N.R.I.” on the scroll at the head of the Cross. So it may be a help to mention, in case any one else should not understand them, that they stand for “Jesus Nazarenus Rex Judaeorum,” which is the Latin for “Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews.” The Letter “I” was in olden times used for “J”. If we look at St. John XIX, 20 and 21, we see that this title was written by Pilate over the Cross in Hebrew, and Greek, and Latin.
May the grace of the Lord Jesus, and the merits of His most sacred Passion, be between us and our enemies.

Clewer parish magazine, August 1917 (D/P39/28A/9)

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