Special friends, together again for eternity

Several Ascot men were reported to have given their lives for their country.

THE WAR.

Again we have to record the death, in service of his country of another of our choicest Ascot young men. William Taylor. What we said last month of Charles Edwards is an exact counterpart to the character of William Taylor. He was a very real soldier of Christ as well as of his country. He was the special friend of Arthur Jones, in the same regiment, and generally sharing the same quarters. They are together again now. May they both be together in peace throughout eternity. R.I.P. Our deep sympathy goes out to the bereaved family.

Edward Charles Cannon has been killed at the front. He is the son or Mr. and Mrs. Cannon of Swinley. His brother was drowned off the Dardanelles rather more than a year ago. To the family we also offer our heartfelt sympathy. R.I.P.

Alfred Thompson is dangerously wounded. His parents have been summoned to the Hospital in France where he is lying.

THE BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ SALE.

We give further details of this most successful Sale (from a Correspondent).

“The Boys’ School undertook the fruit, vegetables, and flower section: and in addition 2 stalls filled with a beautiful and varied collection, small articles (made by the boys) which displayed much ingenuity in the making, were offered for sale. The Belgian ladies and gentlemen from Ascot Wood House brought many interesting articles for sale. Two bran tubs arranged by Mrs. Tustin gave great delight to the children.

The Girls’ School had made itself responsible for the sale of useful and fancy articles. Many things were made by the girls themselves, who gave much time after school hours to complete their work. Many pleasant surprises came in the form of garments and fancy articles made and given by former pupils of the School. Many mothers, not to be outdone by their daughters, helped us much. On the Girls’ stall was a fascinating collection of baskets and other items made by our Infants.

The Infants’ School stall displayed all sorts of delicacies in the shape of cakes, sweets, jam, &c.: but although the store was large, it was quickly sold out, and not even a sweet remained.

Other attractions were the weighing machine which did a flourishing trade: the “village pump,” which brought much “solid water” in the form of prize packets at a surprising rate, and a beautifully dressed baby doll (given by an “old girl”). To win the doll one only had to guess the name that had been given to it at the beginning of the sale.

Our Teachers and Scholars would like to thank all those kind people who so generously helped by giving and by buying.

The sale realised £42 6s. 0d. (for Belgian children).

Winkfield District Magazine, September 1916 (D/P151/28A/8/9)

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