A fight for liberty and honour

The Winkfield parish magazine had news of local soldiers, and a report on the Christmas gifts sent out to the Front. It also took a look back at the lessons of history and the possible meaning for the present war.

We have heard with regret of the death in action of William Cartland, aged 21. He was severely wounded and died the same day.

William Cartland lived here until he enlisted in the Army about three years ago; he was confirmed in 1909, and was a communicant and member of our Guild. He will be deeply mourned by many friends in Winkfield who loved and respected him, and much sympathy is felt for Mrs. Cartland and family in their great loss.

Our wounded.
We welcome home Pte. Albert Carter for a brief rest and convalescence.

Pte. Charles Reed who left for the Front only a few weeks ago, is in hospital at Southampton with frost-bitten legs and rheumatic fever, but we rejoice to hear that he is already convalescent; also that Pte. Charles Lunn, who was wounded, is progressing well in hospital.

We much regret that no further news has been heard of Pte. Charles Streamer, who was reported wounded. It was thought that he was in hospital in England, but the War Office can give no news of his whereabouts, and much sympathy is felt for his relatives in their great anxiety.

We were delighted to see at the beginning of the month Cecil Hayes-Sadler who obtained a few days well earned leave from the Front after some months of most useful and hazardous work as a despatch rider. Mr. Hayes-Sadler has the honour of being the first of our Winkfield Volunteers to get out to the Front.

‘15

In the days when Britannia’s rule of the waves was being established, “the Fifteen” was a common phrase in England to describe the attempt of the “Old Pretender” to regain the crown which his father James II., lost by interfering with the liberties of the English people. A. D. 1715 was the date of that attempt. Few of us, in the present time of trouble, are likely to forget another “Fifteen,” when on June 18th, 1815, 22,000 British Soldiers with a mixed force of 45,000 allied troops withstood 80,000 French veterans on the field of Waterloo. That, too, was a fight for liberty and honour. But the greatest “Fifteen” of all was seven hundred years ago. John, King of England and France had made one of the many attempts of the Norman Kings to destroy the customs and freedom of the English over whom he ruled. At the Island of Running-mead in the Thames Valley, on June 19th, 1215 he was brought to book, signing the Magna Charta, which has since become the charter of freedom not only in England but of the whole civilised world. Again and again John’s successors have tried to revoke that charter – again and again they have been brought to book. At last England grew tired of the incessant struggle and banished the last to break the peace of the realm (James II.). This settled the question, perhaps for ever. Is it too much to hope that out of 1915 may come a similar judgement on rulers who break the peace of Europe?

SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ CHRISTMAS PRESENT SCHEME.

This has now reached a satisfactory conclusion, and 51 parcels have been dispatched. The following warm things were sent out : 24 undervests, 22 pairs of gloves, 8 pairs of socks, 9 helmets, 2 mufflers, 7 mittens, 2 knitted purses, 1 belt, 4 dozen khaki handkerchiefs, 4 air cushions, 2 other presents; and each parcel contained also such items as these: cigarettes, matches, candles, chocolate, soap, string, writing paper, safety pins, a “first aid” to French, and cough lozenges.

Miss Montgomerie wishes to thank all those who helped to bring this undertaking to a satisfactory issue, especially Mrs. Brant and Miss. Jenden, both of whom have given most kind assistance.

Winkfield section of Winkfield District MonthlyMagazine, January 1915 (D/P151/28A/7/1)

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